Displaying items by tag: vixen - Rosie Garland
Sunday, 15 November 2015 14:04

19.11.2015 - Polari Tour, Nottingham

NOTTINGHAM Writers' Studio
25 Hockley,
Nottingham, NG1 1FH
7.30pm – 10.30pm
With Rosie Garland, Gregory Woods, Hayley Green and VG Lee

Hosted by Paul Burston with readings from Gregory Woods, Rosie Garland, Vg Lee and Hayley Green.
Part of this year's Polari National Tour, funded by Arts Council England

This event will be BSL interpreted by Elvire Roberts

£8 (£5 conc) from
http://nottinghamwritersstudio.co.uk/event/polari-literary-salon-event-space/

0115 837224

Published in Gig List
North Manchester FM: Hannah's Bookshelf

 

Saturday, 25th July 2015, 4-6pm.

Listen in to Hannah's Bookshelf on North Manchester FM. As usual, Hannah Kate will be chatting about books she's read and books she loves.
It's Hannah Kate's literature show, on every Saturday 4-6pm, where she talks books, writing and related stuff with her guest for the week.
This week, Rosie Garland will be popping in for a chat.
If you live in or around North Manchester, you can catch the show on 106.6FM. Otherwise, you can listen online.
Click link to listen online

Published in Gig List

Delighted to be invited to write a guest blog for Dr Wanda Wyporska, author of 'Witchcraft in Poland' – a few thoughts of mine on the subject of 'Writing The Weird'.

"One of my earliest – and happiest memories – is being read to by my grandmother. I curled into her lap as she accomplished the miraculous feat of wrapping her arms around me and holding the book at the same time. Since then I have associated being read to with being hugged..."
Read the rest of the interview here:

Click to visit Wanda Wyporska's blog page

Published in News
The Big Comfy Bookshop
Part of Coventry's FIRST Pride!

Time: 3-4pm
Saturday 27th June

Tickets: free! Turn up on the day.
Venue: The Big Comfy Bookshop
UNIT 2F, FARGO VILLAGE
FAR GOSFORD STREET
COVENTRY CV1 5EA

Join us for an afternoon with Rosie Garland!
She will be reading from Vixen and The Palace of Curiosities, talking about writing and answering questions. Taking place at the lovely Big Comfy Bookshop at Fargo Creative Village in Coventry.

Click to go to Fargo Village website

 

Published in Gig List
Friday, 05 June 2015 15:43

23.6.2015 - Polari at The South Bank

Polari

The Southbank Centre,
Belvedere Road,
London SE1 8XX

Time: 7.30 start
Level 5, Function Room

Tickets: £5 (concessions £2.50)

Rosie Garland heads the bill.
Plus Helen Humphries, SJ Naude, Carl Stanley and Talim Arab

Rosie Garland reads from her second novel, Vixen.
Described as poetic, sexy and deeply moving, Vixen finds a natural home with Polari audiences. It's a tale of superstition and devotion in the time of the Black Death.
Garland is joined by Helen Humphries, Talim Arab, Carl Stanley and SJ Naudé.

Polari is London's celebrated literary den showcasing new and established queer talent across literature and spoken word. Resident at Southbank Centre, the award-winning LGBT salon was described by the Huffington Post in 2014 as 'The most exciting literary movement in London... crackling with energy, ideas and excitement'.
Polari is curated and hosted by author and journalist Paul Burston and won 'LGBT Cultural Event of the Year' in the Co-op Respect 'Loved By You' Awards 2013.
Level 5 Function Room at Royal Festival Hall
Please note that Polari contains adult themes. For ages 18+
Book Tickets Now
http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whatson/polari-230615-89943?dt=2015-06-23

Click to go to Polari website

PRAISE FOR POLARI

"The most exciting literary movement in London... crackling with energy, ideas, excitement" – Huffington Post

Winner 'LGBT Cultural Event of the Year' in the Co-operative Respect 'Loved by You' Awards 2013

Winner 'Golden Kitty Award' for 'Best UK Event (Local)' 2013

"Always fun, always thought-provoking – a guaranteed good night out" – Sarah Waters

 

Published in Gig List

I was interviewed recently for WordMothers – a wonderful blog run by Australian writer Nicole Melanson. WordMothers is dedicated to showcasing women's work in the literary arts around the world. It features female author interviews and women in the book industry discussing what they're really passionate about.
Here's the link! Or you can read it in full below.
Click to read the interview on the WordMothers blog

WordMothers – Rosie Garland interviewed by Nicole Melanson
HOW DID YOU GET STARTED?
I was a reader. Even more fabulously, I was read to. Early on, I discovered the joy of being transported to other worlds via the magic of words. It wasn't long before I started telling my own tales. I have a cough-sweet tin filled with books I created for my dolls, and wrote my first novel aged nine - a thrilling adventure involving super-heroines, spaceships and sharks. With pictures.
In fact, on the (mercifully rare) occasions I meet someone who professes to be a writer and yet not have time to read, my chin taps the floor. As Stephen King said: "This is like a guy starting up Mount Everest saying that he didn't have time to buy any rope or pitons."

WHAT IS YOUR LATEST BOOK OR CURRENT PROJECT?
I'm not happy unless I'm busy on a number of projects and am still learning the art of getting that number right...
My second novel 'Vixen' is out in paperback on February 12th and there's a busy book tour coming up. It's set in 1349, the year the Black Death arrived in England. This springs from my fascination with eras when the world was on the cusp of massive change.
I'm writing new poetry. In particular, a sequence of narrative poems inspired by the 2 years I worked as a teacher in Darfur, Sudan. Truly a stranger in a strange land. In addition, I'm getting on with my next novel for HarperCollins. It's at that stage where I hate it, and it is little more than a tangled heap of words.
I'm also treading the boards as Rosie Lugosi the Vampire Queen. If that wasn't enough, my band The March Violets are touring Europe and the USA in autumn 2015 with our new album, Made Glorious.
http://www.marchviolets.com/
Yes- busy. I love the interesting projects that come into my life! One I am particularly excited about is being invited to co-curate the John Rylands Library Literary Gothic exhibition in summer 2015.

WHAT IS YOUR WORK ENVIRONMENT LIKE?
I count myself as very, very lucky. I have a room of my own, to paraphrase Virginia Woolf. It's lined with bookcases and every square inch is stacked with bits and pieces picked up over the years (from Californian sand dollars to statues of Kali and all points in between).
I'm a writer who likes peace to scribble – which is the word I use to describe first-stage work. I love the physicality of handwriting at this stage. When I've got to the editing stage I move to the computer. I know a number of creatives who find music conducive to work – I guess I'm one of those who prefers quiet. I think it's to do with the fact that I love music – if I listen to music while I'm writing I end up singing along and writing goes up the spout.

WHEN DO YOU WORK? WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY LOOK LIKE?
I couldn't begin to say what a typical day is because I don't have them. What follows is a swift gallop around a 'writing day'.
I'm one of those 'morning people'. Morning, afternoon, middle of the night, I don't think it matters one iota as long as you find what works for you. However, I like to get started early. Part of it is because the world is not yet fully awake and that sense of possibility fires me up. Another reason is that I have a vicious internal critic who persists in telling me that everything I do is complete crap. She's a late riser, so I get up before she does and get started before the headtalk kicks in.
One of the things I wrestle with is the balance between writing and admin / social networking. A certain amount of the latter is unavoidable – it comes with the territory of writing being my job – but the knack is to refuse to let Twitter take over my life. I do admin in the afternoon. When I'm on a roll, I'll write into the evenings. It varies.
Also important is for me to take breaks. Not just to move the muscles, but to stay fresh. I take a leaf out of Julia Cameron's 'The Artists' Way' and go on an Artists' Date at least once a week: visit a museum, a gallery, or hang out with a creative friend.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Artist%27s_Way

WHAT IS YOUR WORK PROCESS?
I use creative rituals to get me started in the morning.
I'm not alone in being terrified of the blank page and a routine with small steps helps get the creative juices flowing. My day begins with three pages of journaling. This is not so much creative writing as a place to dump 'what I did yesterday' and clear the mind.
My rituals change (damn right too), but right now I like the exercise of writing six images (eg - something I can see / hear / smell, or that struck me yesterday). Coming out of the six images I write a haiku. Then the classic morning pages: three pages of free writing (the magic of 'threes'!). With those warm-ups under my belt, I get cracking on a heftier task like editing a chapter. An athlete wouldn't run a marathon from cold. My take is that a novelist functions in much the same way.
I want to grow, so seek out feedback and input. That might be going on a writing course, a writing retreat, getting feedback from creative colleagues, agent or editor. I am hungry to learn. For me, writing is a life process and is never done. At the age of 90, Pablo Casals was asked why he continued to practice the cello. 'Because I think I'm making progress,' was his reply.

WHY DO YOU DO WHAT YOU DO?
There are times when I feel writing chose me. I write because I am made of stories. I write to work out and express how I think and feel. Writing as breathing out. Roald Dahl said - "A person is a fool to become a writer. His only compensation is absolute freedom. He has no master except his own soul, and that, I am sure, is why he does it."

WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU?
The odd, the unusual, the folk who don't fit. I've always written about outsiders; whoever they might be. My fiction is about people who won't (or can't) squeeze into the one-size-fits-all templates on offer and the friction that occurs when they try.
I know this comes from having always been an outsider myself. My mother used to ask, 'why can't you write nice stories?' However, I don't explore dark themes as some kind of pose, or to be challenging for the sake of it. I write what I write because that's what comes knocking.
Sure, I can produce something that doesn't fire me up (I've tried), but my heart's not in it. There's the rub: I write where my passions reside. I've chased myself in circles trying to second-guess what a publisher 'might' want and it was a disaster. There's no point twisting yourself into shapes trying to please. That way lies madness, and not the interesting, creative sort. Maybe it's one of the reasons it took me so long for my novels to get published. But that's a different blog: http://booksbywomen.org/rosie-garland/

WHAT IS THE HARDEST PART OF WHAT YOU DO?
Keeping going.
As I mentioned above, I struggle with an internal critic who never says anything nice and never, ever stops. Simply put, this inner censor wants me to stop writing. It's been there since I was in my early teens, and shows no sign of going away. Sure, it's had to change its script a little over the past few years what with the launch of debut novel 'The Palace of Curiosities' and follow-up 'Vixen', but it has simply developed nasty new mantras. One example: when people say they like 'The Palace of Curiosities', they're only being nice.
I used to listen to and believe every word I heard. Result? I stopped writing. Call it writers' block if you will. An important part of my writing life has been improving how I deal with internalised put-downs.
The first step was to call the voice 'Mavis'. If you'd like to read my blog on Dealing with the Internal Critic – here it is.
http://www.rosiegarland.com/news-and-events/item/177-being-a-writer-dealing-with-the-internal-censor.html

WHAT IS YOUR VISION AS A WORD ARTIST OR BOOK INDUSTRY PROFESSIONAL?
To communicate. To share. To get my stories out there and enable other word artists to do the same. To encourage - myself as well as others - to tell our stories. Especially when the mainstream world tells us those stories are uninteresting, dangerous, weird, off-kilter and just plain wrong. Especially when the mainstream world tells us that.

WHO ARE YOUR FAVOURITE FEMALE AUTHORS?
Oh goodness, how long have you got? I've been asked this question a gazillion times and I've yet to find a snappy answer. It's impossible! Which is good. I've read work by so many inspiring women that there simply isn't room to list them.

Published in News

Really delighted to be interviewed in Issue 3 of Network Buzz!
Here's the link:
Click to read Network Buzz online

or you can read the full interview here...

Thomas Anderson Inclusive Networks interview

2015 has got off to a great start thank you. I'm now working for myself which is wonderful. Hope you're well and excited about the paperback release of Vixen.

1 - Your second novel Vixen is about to be released on paperback. What's the book about?

The year is 1349. In an isolated village deep in a forest in the south west of England, the arrival of a mysterious young woman – the Vixen - turns the lives of the villagers upside down.
I am fascinated by times when the world was on the cusp of massive change. 1349 was the year the Black Death struck England. Its shadow could be seen advancing across Europe. I wanted to capture that sense of a deadly, inescapable force heading your way.

2 - Are isolation and loneliness things that you personally fear?

Not any more.
But I've had my share. I spent my teenage years in Devon, which was not a good place to be in any way 'different'. It wasn't just about sexuality – anything that wasn't marriage and 2.4 children (preferably with one on its way by the age of 16) was regarded as deeply suspect. I yearned for escape and counted the days till I was 18 and could escape.

3 - Your debut novel 'The Palace of Curiosities' was very well received and is adored by many people. What were you feeling ahead of the release of Vixen last year?

Fear!
As my follow-up novel, it felt like the 'difficult second album' on occasion. Vixen is a different book to 'The Palace of Curiosities' and not just in the 500-year time shift.
I have a nasty inner critic – Mavis - who never ever says anything nice. She kept whispering that the reaction would be a sneering 'Ok, so people liked 'The Palace of Curiosities'. They aren't going to like Vixen.'
Luckily, that hasn't been the case.
I've blogged about Mavis here: http://www.rosiegarland.com/news-and-events/item/177-being-a-writer-dealing-with-the-internal-censor.html

4 - How did you feel when the book began receiving lots of great feedback and was dubbed 'Best for Historical Fiction fans' in Grazia's Summer reading list?

I've been astounded by the great response! Here's a snippet from the amazing review in Diva: 'Poetic, surprising and ultimately deeply moving, Vixen will have you hooked faster than it takes to drink a jug of ale and – unlike ale – it will stay with you long after you've reached the final page.'

5 - How important are magazine and online reviews to you?

Very and not at all, if that makes any sense.
Positive reviews are wonderful; I'd be lying if I said they weren't. I'm extremely lucky to have had nothing but - so far. I won't let them go to my head. I'd hate to become one of those people who are so puffed up about themselves they believe their own publicity and are a complete nightmare to be around. After all, a review is a personal opinion and nothing more.

6 - Do you think your books would adapt well to the small, or big, screen and how would you react if this idea was brought to you?

I would be delighted! Seriously, I'd do my massively uncool happy dance.

7 - You're a big advocate of local book stores. Why do you think it's so important to shop local and support the independent book stores?

I don't know about anyone else, but I think it matters when yet another indie or queer-friendly café / club / shop closes down and is replaced with a faceless retail chain. Who wants to live in a neighbourhood where the only option is Starbucks?
Oh yes - and indie stores pay their taxes and treat their staff like human beings. Next!

8 - We're seeing many local libraries close due to cuts. How important do you think public libraries are and did they play a part in your own dreams to be a writer?
It frightens me when folk say we don't need libraries 'because everything's online and free'. Er – no it isn't. Libraries are far more than a repository of books. A positive childhood memory is the Saturday trip to the local library. I explored new worlds, learned new things, thought new thoughts. It was the beginning of a love affair that's still going strong. It was National Libraries Day recently. Here's my love letter:
http://www.rosiegarland.com/news-and-events/item/649-20112014-a-passion-for-libraries.html

9 - You take part in lots of literary events and book tours. Are these something you enjoy (and why) and are these important to authors?
I love doing readings. Maybe it's connected to happy memories of being read to as a kid. Before I could read, I was hooked by the magic of words.
Sure, I understand not every writer enjoys live readings, but I get a buzz when I can communicate and share my stories. If that encourages and enables others to tell theirs – that's even better. We need to get our work out there, even when the mainstream world tells us it is uninteresting, weird, or just plain wrong. Especially when the mainstream world tells us that.

10 - Did you have any literary role models growing up? Were you encouraged to follow your dreams at school and at home?

I had great teachers who encouraged me to write. I produced my first novel aged nine: a science fiction extravaganza featuring rockets and sharks. With pictures. All of that was fine till I started exploring the more macabre / queerer side of life in my teens. The encouragement evaporated and was replaced by disapproval.
Luckily, I was a stubborn brat and kept going.

11 - It's International Womens Day on 8th March. Is there a female in your life who has inspired you the most in your career and/or personal life?

That is such a difficult question. Impossible to answer!
I guess the first of many inspirational women was my grandmother. She always had time to read stories and listen to mine. We shared a love of splashing in puddles and climbing trees. She accepted who I was and didn't force me into being something I wasn't.

12 - You're also the lead vocalist of The March Violets. We'd love to know more about the group and what you have planned music wise for 2015?

Singing is one of life's particular pleasures. The March Violets is unusual in having a male / female duo fronting the band – Si Denbigh and myself. We reformed in 2007, thinking we'd do a one-off reunion gig. But hundreds of fans turned up and made it very clear they weren't going to let us go away again.
This year we're playing Europe and the USA. In 2014 we toured the West Coast from Seattle to LA. It was incredible - we had such a wonderful welcome. The plan is to head to the East Coast in 2015 with the new album, 'Made Glorious'. Keep an eye on the website!
http://www.marchviolets.com/

13 - Novel number 3. When can we expect this? Will you be exploring any new genres or themes?

I'm working on it – slowly! I'm at that early stage where it's a tangled heap of words. I go through phases of thinking it's complete rubbish. Luckily I have an encouraging editor at HarperCollins.
It's set just before WW1 and revolves around family secrets. Once again, I've been drawn to a period of upheaval; specifically that moment shortly before enormous changes take place. I view those times rather like an indrawn breath, held and not released.

14 - What's next for you?

I'm busy on a number of projects, which suits me fine. I'd get bored if I was only doing one thing. The trick is to get that number right...
The book tour for the paperback release of 'Vixen' is ongoing through March and April. There's the new novel to get on with, plus The March Violets tour mentioned above. If that wasn't enough, I'm treading the boards as Rosie Lugosi the Vampire Queen. Plus I'm writing new poetry, in particular, a sequence of narrative poems inspired by the 2 years I worked as a teacher in Darfur, Sudan. Truly a stranger in a strange land.
So - 2015 is already busy. I love the fascinating projects that come into my life! One that's very exciting is being invited to co-curate the John Rylands Library Literary Gothic exhibition in summer 2015. And I am headlining Polari Literary Salon in June – wow!

Published in News
Part of Independent Booksellers Week 2015

Bookseller Crow on the Hill
50 Westow Street
Crystal Palace
London SE19 3AF

Time: 7 for 7.30 and finished by 9pm.

Rosie Garland will be reading alongside Brooklyn author Kathleen Alcott whose debut Infinite Home is out in July.

Click to go Bookseller Crow webpage

Published in Gig List

ebb and flo bookshop
12 Gillibrand St,
Chorley
PR7 2EJ
Tickets available from the bookshop or Eventbrite (link below)
£5 (glass of wine included and £2 redeemable against the book).

Rosie Garland – reading from Vixen, talking about writing and answering questions!
Arrive from 7pm for a 7.30pm start.

Click link to buy tickets from Eventbrite

 

Published in Gig List

The Vixen paperback launch continues!

 

Thanks and gratitude for the wonderful welcomes and enthusiastic audiences so far.

That's Bar Wotever (London), Manchester Waterstones, The Book Case (Hebden Bridge), Booka Books (Oswestry), the WI Manchester & The Arvon Foundation at Lumb Bank!

 

Coming up - Word at the Y (Leicester), Waterstones Bradford, Polari at Huddersfield Literature Festival, INCITE (London), Watford Central Library for Herts Litfest 2015 & Literary Death Match in Shoreditch, London. Check the gig list page for details...

 

Oh yes - I've never had an entire window painted in my honour before - thanks to the amazing artistic skills of Louisa Jones at Booka Books in Oswestry!

Published in News

News and Events

  • April 2020 - The Night Brother, Must-Read Manchester
    April 2020 - The Night Brother, Must-Read Manchester
    Manchester Confidential chooses The Night Brother as a must-read Manchester novel!

    Dystopian classics to modern crime - Nine must-read Manchester novels

    “Fantasy, romance, sci-fi, comedy…we’ve got a genre for everyone
    There’s a very good reason Manchester is a UNESCO City of Literature, as we highlighted before its bid to join the prestigious network in 2017. Innovative publishers, diverse bookshops and a lively events scene make it an unrivalled literary melting pot.

    Rosie Garland’s The Night Brother is our historical highlight
    Ever the entertainer, Rosie Garland sung in post-punk band The March Violets and now performs ‘twisted cabaret’ as Rosie Lugosi the Vampire Queen. But she’s also a literary maverick with an array of essays, short stories and poetry to her name (much of which she also reads at spoken words events citywide) and three acclaimed novels. Her latest, The Night Brother, navigates themes of gender and identity through two siblings in Victorian Manchester. Rich and Gothic, it’s a must for fans of Angela Carter.”

    https://confidentials.com/manchester/dystopian-classics-to-modern-crime-nine-must-read-manchester-novels

    Written on Thursday, 16 April 2020 18:18
  • April 2020 - The Night Brother - Best Northern Read
    April 2020 - The Night Brother - Best Northern Read

    An unexpected & encouraging piece of news!
    Northern Soul has selected 'The Night Brother' as a Best Northern Read

    Desmond Bullen, Northern Soul writer
    “In days that can seem desolate and uncertain, there’s a lot to be said for windows into a better world and, ultimately, joyfully, that is exactly the view that The Night Brother by Rosie Garland affords. Not that its window seat is cheaply achieved. Far from it.
    Rooted with disbelief-suspending specificity in Manchester at the end of the 19th century, Garland’s novel blossoms compellingly from the exquisite simplicity of its central conceit, one which owes the tiniest debt to the 1971 horror film Dr. Jekyll And Sister Hyde. Edie and her brother Gnome are joined in a very particular symbiosis, so that their singular sibling rivalry threatens to be the undoing of both. Themes that could be leaden in other hands emerge from the premise with a beautiful lightness of touch, developing into a persuasive fable of inclusivity and self-acceptance. This is a book that sings a rainbow at its end.”


    https://www.northernsoul.me.uk/books-best-northern-reads-part-one/

    Written on Thursday, 09 April 2020 15:26
  • 'What Girls Do In The Dark' - new poetry collection with Nine Arches Press
    'What Girls Do In The Dark' - new poetry collection with Nine Arches Press
    New collection forthcoming in October 2020 from Nine Arches Press

    I’m thrilled to be on the 2020 list of Nine Arches Press!
    I’m in the company of a fantastic group of poets. I couldn’t be happier.

    https://www.ninearchespress.com/about-us/news.html

    “Midlands-based independent poetry publisher Nine Arches Press, which achieved Arts Council England National Portfolio Organisation status in 2018, will publish eleven new books of poetry in 2020, from a mix of established and emerging poets from across the UK and across the world…

    Acclaimed novelist Rosie Garland will also join the 2020 list in October with her third full collection of poems What Girls Do in the Dark, a book alive with galactic, glimmering energy. Rosie’s award-winning short and long fiction, poems and essays have been widely anthologised and in 2019 she was selected by Val McDermid as one of the 10 most compelling LGBTQI+ writers working in the UK.”

    Image: Poets confirmed for the Nine Arches Press 2020 list
    Top: l-r: Jennifer Wong, Rishi Dastidar, Abegail Morley, Geraldine Clarkson, Nina Mingya Powles.
    Bottom: l-r: Peter Kahn, Maria Taylor, Gregory Leadbetter, Rosie Garland, Kate Fox

    Written on Saturday, 08 February 2020 14:20
  • 11th & 12th January 2020 - Bhubaneswar Literary Meet & Mumbai Spoken Fest
    11th & 12th January 2020 - Bhubaneswar Literary Meet & Mumbai Spoken Fest

    I’m deeply honoured!
    The British Council has invited me to read, perform, and present workshops in India…
    I’ve been invited to TWO exciting literary events: Bhubaneswar Literary Meet (11th January 2020) AND Mumbai Spoken Fest by Kommune (12th January 2020).

    I can’t wait – not only for the opportunity to share my work in India for the first time… but to meet so many inspiring writers!

    Written on Monday, 23 December 2019 14:19
  • 10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today
    10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today

    I’m thrilled to announce that Val McDermid has selected me as one of the 10 most compelling LGBTQI+ writers working in the UK today!

    Val said: “These writers are writing for everyone. These are not words for a niche readership. These are not writings for a ghetto. These are the works of writers who have something to say that can be – and should be – heard by as many people as possible.”

    She continued: “Auden was wrong when he claimed “poetry makes nothing happen”. Words do change the world, reader by reader. They open our eyes, they provoke thought. The work of these 10 writers… will awaken in us fresh delight in the wonder of words.”

    The list was commissioned by the National Centre for Writing and British Council, supported by Arts Council England as part of a two-year programme to promote writing from the UK to an international audience. It also includes the amazing Colette Bryce, Juno Dawson, Juliet Jacques, Keith Jarrett, Kirsty Logan, Andrew McMillan, Fiona Mozley, Mary Paulson-Ellis & Luke Turner.

    The Guardian - The Word Is Out. Val McDermid selects Britain's 10 most outstanding lgbtq writers

    Written on Wednesday, 14 August 2019 08:44