Displaying items by tag: rosie garland - Rosie Garland
SCHUNCK & NIEUWE NOR presents: GRAUKUNST

GRAUKUNST is an exhibition of works by well-known pioneers as young artists, rooted in and inspired by the musical underground of the eighties. The exhibition was shown at the Melkweg Gallery in Amsterdam, following the Grauzone Festival in 2013. Now we present GRAUKUNST at Schunck * & Nieuwe Nor in Heerlen.

The exhibition opening event will feature a special performance poetry reading by

Rosie Garland (The March Violets, UK)

Exhibition opening concert April 10, 18h – 19.30

Schunck * entrance hall
Bongerd 18,
6411 JM Heerlen,
Netherlands

Click to go to event website

Published in Gig List

Poppodium Nieuwe NOR

Pancratiusstraat 30,
6411KC Heerlen
NETHERLANDS

20:30 until 23:30

FACEBOOK EVENT: click for Facebook event page

ADVANCE TICKETS: click here for ticket link

De legendarische band The March Violets komt op 10 april voor een exclusief Nederlands optreden naar Poppodium Nieuwe NOR in Heerlen. De band, die met labelmaatjes The Sisters of Mercy destijds aan de wieg stond van het gothic (rock)-genre, maakte in 1981 haar debuut in Leeds. Ultra-donkere nummers als ''Snake Dance' en 'Walk Into The Sun' zijn nog altijd krakers op de dansvloer.

The March Violets is een niet-alledaagse, unieke groep die eigenlijk zo onwaarschijnlijk is dat ze eigenlijk niet zou moeten bestaan. Als een van de eerste bands maakten ze, met labelmaatjes van Sisters of Mercy, gebruik van een drumcomputer op het podium. Toch is hun sound nog donkerder dan die van The Sisters, hun teksten verwarrender en hun humor zo bizar dat ze hun nummer beschrijven als 'simplistische pop anthems voor een blanke generatie'.

In 1981 maakte The March Violets haar debuut in Leeds, de stad waarvan wordt gezegd dat deze aan de basis staat van de gothic rock, met acts als The Danse Society, The Sisters of Mercy, Southern Death Cult en Red Lorry Yellow Lorry. Twee albums brachten ze uit op het Merciful Release-label vol met post-punk energie, woeste poëzie en songs als 'Snake Dance' en 'Walk Into The Sun', nog altijd krakers op de dansvloer. 'The Violets' waren niet alleen Gothic Doom Rock, ze hadden Soul en een donkere grillige energie die dreigde zichzelf te verscheuren. En wat onvermijdelijk was gebeurde; in 1987 hield de band ermee op.

In 2007 en 2010 kwam de band voor exclusieve reünie-shows in Engeland weer bij elkaar en in 2012 maakte men voor het eerst de overstap naar het Europese vasteland om op grote festivals als Wave Gothik Treffen en Shadowplay (Waregem) te spelen. En nu, met drie van de vier originele bandleden, komen ze op 10 april 2014, voor het eerst naar een club in Europa, in de stad waar wave, ebm en gothic rock nog steeds op veel bijval kunnen rekenen, Heerlen. Let op: op 10 mei staat ook clan of xymox (waarmee huidig March Violets' gitarist Tom Ashton ook nog deel uitmaakte) in poppodium NIEUWE NOR tijdens de tweede editie van het 'Repost' festival!

De kaartverkoop start op zaterdag 18 januari om 10:00 uur.

Published in Gig List
Friday, 14 February 2014 16:54

5.4.2014 - The March Violets, York

A little Purple Do...
The Fulford Arms
121 Fulford Road,
York, YO10 4EX

United Kingdom

7pm till late

A little purple do... Convivial and intimate. We decided to do a thing where we rehearsed, maybe a new Song, definitely a full set, then screened the Dan E Falicki film 'An Anti American' that Tom did the score for. With Free Popcorn!

We will be providing general chitchat, and some other stuff. Unholy Racket will have an exhibition of his prints. There'll be a raffle for something good, some Psydwr, Si's Caipirinha Cocktails, probably some gourmet food available from the chefs. A bit of a disco afterwards. Who knows what may turn up.

Limited Numbers, Late Licence, Lots of Lounging around.

Tickets will be £12, available from the Fulford Arms, or online at

Click to buy tickets

Click to go to The March Violets website

Bring your Paypal receipt as a ticket, and as entry into the raffle.

Published in Gig List
Holland Park Press author reading
Great Western Studios
65 Alfred Road
London W2 5EU

Free entry

7pm – 10pm

Rosie Garland reads her award-winning fiction & poetry, alongside fellow Holland Park Press author, Arnold Jansen op de Haar.

The gallery in the Great Western Studios, 65 Alfred Road W2 5EU, is our spectacular venue. It's only 5 minutes walk from Royal Oak & Westbourne Park tube station and buses 18 & 36 stop nearby. Here is a handy map.

It's all free but to make sure we cater for all of you, please let us know if you're coming by emailing or phoning us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

07792611929.

Click to go to Holland Park Press website

Published in Gig List

Issue 79 of The Rialto has just come out - and my poem 'Asking for Directions' is in it. The best Valentine's Day gift I could ask for.

I am very proud to have a second poem in this amazing magazine (described by Carol Ann Duffy as 'simply the best'). And yes – you can buy a copy via their website.

Click to go the The Rialto webpage

Published in News
Friday, 07 February 2014 13:25

28.3.2014 - Cheltenham Poetry Festival

The Quiet Compere presents A Matter of Life, Death and Poetry

Copa

66 Regent Street

Cheltenham

GL50 1HA

8-10pm (doors 7.30pm)

Tickets: £5/4

The Quiet Compere introduces them with little fanfare, so that the poems (and not the poets' track records) tell you all you need to know.

This festival special features a stellar line-up – Rosie Garland, Samir Guglani, Sarah Maxwell, Bethany W Pope, Stephanie Portersmith, Rod Tame, Avril Staple and

of course the compere herself, Sarah Dixon.

Let poetry show you what really matters! Join us for a selection of darkly funny, thought-provoking and life-changing poetry.

Sarah L Dixon

Rosie Garland

Samir Guglani

Sarah Maxwell

Bethany W Pope

Stephanie Portersmith

Avril Staple

Rod Tame

The brochure showing the full Festival programme will be on line on the Festival website by 14 February.

Click here to visit Cheltenham Poetry Festival website

Click here to book tickets

Published in Gig List
Friday, 07 February 2014 13:09

18.3.2014 - Literature Live, Bolton Octagon

The University of Bolton presents: Literature Live: Rosie Garland
Octagon Theatre,
Howell Croft South
Bolton BL1 1SB

7.30pm

£5 (£2, £3 conc)

A prestigious collection of writers and poets read from their own work in this ever popular programme of events.

An eclectic writer and performer, ranging from singing in cult gothic band The March Violets, to twisted alter-ego Rosie Lugosi the Vampire Queen. Rosie Garland has five solo collections of poetry and is winner of the DaDa Award for Performance Artist of the Year and a Poetry Award from the People's Café, New York.

She also won the Mslexia Novel competition in 2012 and her debut novel The Palace of Curiosities was published in March 2013 by HarperCollins.

Rosie will be reading from her novel and poetry as well as hosting an open mic slot.

Click to book tickets via Bolton Octagon website

Published in Gig List
SHE GRRROWLS

showcases a range of talented women and includes poetry, comedy and a musical finale. Come along and take part in the all-inclusive OPEN MIC section, which is themed. Every third Monday of the month.

The Gallery Cafe
21 Old Ford Road
Bethnal Green
London E2 9PJ

7:30pm - 10:30pm

£5 on the door

Featuring Rosie Garland, Rachel McCrum, Rose Swainston, Lizanne Davies and Mushana.

All ticket sales go towards the payment of artists and producers with an even door split.

The Gallery Cafe is part of St Margaret's House which supports the local community in a variety of ways and allows free hire for events. - www.stmargaretshouse.org.uk

https://www.facebook.com/SheGrrrowls

Follow us on Twitter: @shegrrrowls

http://shegrrrowls.tumblr.com/

For an open mic slot contact

Carmina Masoliver

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Published in Gig List
Friday, 07 February 2014 11:45

10.3.2014 - Evidently poetry night, Salford

Punk poetry bites back in Salford
Eagle Inn,
18 Collier Street,
City of Salford
M3 7DW

7.30pm

£3 on the door

Join us for another night of "clever, witty and thought-provoking entertainment" at Evidently!

Boasting the fabulous talents of Rosie Garland and hosted by Salford's own Kieren King.

Not to be missed!

Also eight open mic spots are available (one poem - two minutes per poet) on a first come first served basis so if you would like a slot please arrive early to avoid disappointment. We are filming each night so everyone who performs will get a shiny new Youtube video if they want one.

Host, multiple slam winner Kieren King says "If you walk down a street and see three signs, one advertising live music, one advertising live comedy and the third advertising live poetry chances are people would go to either of the first two. We are looking to change that and give people a fun and entertaining night out".

Forget what you learned in school. This is poetry at its best.

Click to view Evidently's YouTube channel

Published in Gig List
Someone out there loves your work. Maybe they just haven't seen it yet.

Here's my blog on Women Writers, Women Books. Get submitting. Then the person who loves your work might actually get to see it.

Click for Books By Women website

This month, three judges decide the winner of the 2nd Mslexia Unpublished Novel Competition. Someone is about to receive a life-changing phone call. Two years ago, I was that woman.

I never imagined I would be. Fairytales are for other folk. I'd lost faith in my writing 'getting anywhere': indeed, I'd lost faith in my ability to write. But my winning novel, The Palace of Curiosities, was published in March 2013 by HarperCollins UK, one of the world's largest publishing companies. It's still a shock.

Like many writers, I've been writing for as long as I remember (I have a cough-sweet tin filled with miniature books I wrote for my dolls). By the end of the 90s I'd had poetry and short stories published, and I'd built up a following on the performance poetry circuit. I got an idea for a novel and was buoyed up by a run of early success: commendations in two fiction competitions and interest from a small publisher.

The crowning event of 2000 was a letter from a major London literary agency. They'd seen my competition entry, were impressed, and wanted to represent me. I danced around the room! I showed them my first novel, expecting wild enthusiasm. The agent advised waiting for a mainstream deal, so I turned down the small press. Naively, I waited for lucrative deals to come flying in. They didn't.

Over the next twelve years, I wrote four-and-a-half novels. Not one was 'good enough', however hard I tried – and I tried very hard. Then I was passed to a different agent who regaled me with stories of the terrible state of the publishing industry. No-one showed interest in what I was writing.

I stopped telling friends about my novels, humiliated by rejection after rejection. I regretted turning down the small publisher. It was a tough job to keep going during those long, slow, arid years. Then I got throat cancer and everything stopped while I put my life-energy into recovery. But there's nothing like a peek at your sell-by date to give you a boot up the backside. So, after I got the all-clear I emailed my agent and said, Let's Do This Thing. He didn't even reply.

His final rejection was my lowest point. I needed to move on. I could not continue putting my life into something that was giving me no nourishment. I didn't regret those twelve years, because no writing is ever wasted. But it was time to stop banging my head against a brick wall.

In 2011 Mslexia announced their Inaugural Novel Competition. As a last-ditch-last-fling, I dusted off novels #3 and #4 and sent them in, figuring I had nothing to lose except the entry fee. Both made the shortlist of ten. I was astounded: perhaps I could write fiction, after all. And one of the judges was Sarah Waters. A writing heroine. Liked. My. Work.

Novel #4, 'The Palace of Curiosities' won outright. Within a week I had an enthusiastic new agent. Within a fortnight she sent it to fifteen UK publishers and I was at the heart of a bidding war. The result was a 2-book deal with HarperCollins UK. It was bizarre – the same words in the same order, yet a year before I couldn't get it through the door of one publisher, let alone fifteen. I spent a long time pinching myself.

To say winning the Mslexia Novel Competition boosted my confidence is a vast understatement. I've proved to myself that I can write fiction: it was just a case of finding the right people to read it. The competition was judged anonymously and that makes me particularly proud. I am not This Year's Bright Young Thing, have not attended a fashionable Creative Writing Masters program, nor do I have industry connections. I won because of the quality of the writing.

It was the best £25 I spent in my entire life. I strongly encourage writers to enter as many competitions as possible. Someone out there loves your work – but they need to see it. So get it out there. Do it now.

Yes, I still have crises of self-doubt. But I've discovered a sense of validation, a punching-the-air 'I did it!' The win - and the resulting two-book deal – have given financial choices I never thought to have. I've given up my day job to focus full-time on writing. I've received writing commissions, invitations to lecture on University courses, been nominated for and won awards, toured book festivals...

I still subscribe to Mslexia. I still get up every morning and write. I take nothing for granted. I'm not a rest-on-my-laurels gal. I've built resilience, learned humility and discovered the extent of my determination to keep going in the face of rejection and failure. And I have regained a belief in my writing.

Published in News

News and Events

  • 'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    How to ask for a residency

    Since I wrote about the Power of Asking, I’ve been heartened by how many writers have told me they’re going to ask for Writers’ Residencies too. There are plenty of questions: What do you say? What do you ask for? This blog offers a few suggestions.

    Where do you want your residency to be?
    Chip shop, bus stop, lighthouse, theatre, cemetery. The choice is yours. Think of where you’d love to write. It may be a place you pass every day on the way to work, or somewhere you’ve stumbled on by chance. Perhaps you have a connection already. For example, when I was invited to read at The John Rylands Library, I fell in love with this Mancunian gem. It sparked a train of thought…

    What do you want to do?
    I’ve a pretty simple plan: my next novel is set in The John Rylands and I’m exploring what it’s like to write ‘on site’, drawing inspiration from the spirit of the place. You’ll have your own ideas. It’s a wonderful opportunity to try something new, with time to focus on your writing in an inspiring workspace. The clearer you are about what you’d like to create and how it’s connected to the venue you’ve chosen, the better. Do your research, and put together a proposal. I’ve broken this down below.

    How long is a residency?
    Weeks, months, or a year – it’s largely up to you and the organisation. My residency is running for a calendar year; time to produce a first draft of the novel. I’ve committed to being on site for one day a week, but can’t keep away from the place…

    What can you offer?
    As well as being clear about what you want to achieve, think about what you can offer your host organisation. Ideas can include giving talks, workshops, writing tutorials or readings, and writing blogs on the progress of the residency. You might produce a poem etched in the window, or devise a grand finale performance. There’s no limit.
    If you’re unsure, ask for advice from writer friends (or friends of friends) who’ve done residencies in the past. If you don’t know any – ask the internet. Social media can be a lot more supportive than you might imagine.

    How do you get an introduction?
    You’ll need to approach your chosen organisation to find out of they’re interested in your idea. I asked writer friends for signposting, and got an introduction. People were only too pleased to help, a warm reminder that we’re in this together. There’s a community of writers out there, and we are pretty groovy people.

    What about money?
    This blog is about building your own residency from scratch, not applying for a funded opportunity. So, when the question of money and payment arose (pretty much the first question), I said no. Nowhere has money for residencies, unless it’s a regular gig like The Forestry Commission
    And, unsurprisingly, these residencies are massively oversubscribed.
    A personal tip is to source funding elsewhere. I applied to The Arts Council - Successfully.

    Then again – aim for the stars! One writer told me she’s asking for a residency at a private members’ club with buckets of money. Needless to say, she IS asking them to fund it.

    What’s the worst that can happen?
    Fear of the word no can stop us asking in the first place. Your chosen venue may say no. But they’re not going to poke you with forks. Trust me on this one. And in the words of Steve Jobs: “Most people don't get experiences because they never ask. I've never found anybody who didn't want to help me when I've asked them for help.”

    Keep going. Keep asking.

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2019/02/26/how-to-ask-for-a-residency/

    Written on Sunday, 24 March 2019 10:08
  • 'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library
    'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library

    As part of my Writer’s Residency at The John Rylands Library, I’m writing a series of blogs… here’s the first – The Power of Asking.

    “I’ve just been appointed the first writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library. How did I manage this wonderful achievement? I asked.

    Sounds easy.

    It wasn’t. If you’re anything like me (and the longer I live, the more I realise I’m not alone), asking is far more difficult than it sounds.

    Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Unless you were born with a set of silver spoons in your mouth (which is everyone reading this, right?), then you’ve worked out that opportunities don’t fall magically into your lap. You’ve had to work hard to get where you are.

    I like what Julia Cameron (author of the inspirational ‘The Artists Way’) says: “Pray to catch the bus, then run as fast as you can.” It’s a reminder to put myself into the path of opportunities. The bus does not come to the front door. I have to leave the house, and darn well run for it.

    I have to take a deep breath, and ask. So, why is it so difficult?

    Here’s my take. I grew up with a spectacularly unhelpful dictum: Ask, don’t get. Don’t ask, don’t want. I shared this with friends recently, and was shocked to discover it’s very common. I end up stuck in a bizarre Catch 22 situation, thinking that if I have to ask for something, then I don’t deserve it. Or, that I must to wait for someone else to ask me. The most I’m allowed to do is stand around looking hopeful.
    This lose-lose mentality is combined with a vicious internal critic. I call her Mavis (I’ve blogged about her here and run Anti-Mavis workshops). She never, ever says anything nice. If someone says they like my writing, Mavis jumps in and whispers ‘they’re only being nice.’ In fact, she can be neatly summed up by this great Savage Chickens cartoon (Doug Savage):

    Naturally, my internal critic undermined any notion that somewhere as amazing as The John Rylands Library would want the likes of me.

    So – standing up and asking for what I want can be pretty damn hard. I’m swamped with fears of rejection, coming over as needy, an underachiever, someone who’s failed because they need to ask.

    Luckily, this isn’t a poor-me blog.

    Years ago I decided that I was not going to let fear of rejection stop me living a life that is too darn short as it is. I take inspiration from Jia Jiang, whose TED talk about dealing with rejection is well worth 15 minutes of anyone’s time.

    So, however hard it is to ask, to put myself forward, to send that manuscript to a competition or agent – I take several deep breaths and do it. In the words of Susan Jeffers: ‘feel the fear and do it anyway’.

    And here’s the good news. The John Rylands Library is delighted to have a writer-in-residence. Correction: The John Rylands Library is delighted to have me as a writer-in-residence.

    I have told Mavis to put that in her pipe and smoke it.

    Coming next – what I asked for, and how to ask for a residency.”

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2018/12/10/the-power-of-asking/

    Written on Saturday, 02 March 2019 15:36
  • January 2019 - short fiction highlights
    January 2019 - short fiction highlights
    Great to start the new year with a slew of short fiction highlights!

    My story ‘Burning Girl’ is in the ‘Disturbing the Beast’ anthology from Boudicca Press, out February 2019.

    My flash fic, ‘Your sons & your daughters are beyond’ is being published in Longleaf Review on Feb 10th 2019 http://longleafreview.com/

    … flash fic ‘What goes on in the bushes’ is featured in issue 16 of The Cabinet of Heed, mid-January 2019
    https://cabinetofheed.com/

    I’ve been
    Longlisted in TSS flash fiction competition, winter 2018
    https://www.theshortstory.co.uk/flash-fiction-400/flash-fiction-results/
    &
    Longlisted in Reflex flash fiction competition, winter 2018
    https://www.reflexfiction.com/flash-fiction-contest-schedule/

    Written on Wednesday, 16 January 2019 14:20
  • 1.12.2018 - Man City match - singing The Pankhurst Anthem
    1.12.2018 - Man City match - singing The Pankhurst Anthem

    What an adventure!
    On Saturday December 1st, I sang the Pankhurst Anthem – specially written by Helen Pankhurst & Lucy Pankhurst - in Etihad Stadium in front of the Manchester City crowd at half time!

    I can honestly say I've never sung in front of a crown of 50,000 people. What an experience.

    All part of the run-up to the unveiling of Hazel Reeves wonderful statue of Emmeline Pankhurst in St Peter’s Square, Manchester on December 14th 2018.

    Written on Friday, 07 December 2018 11:01
  • November 2018 - The John Rylands Library writer-in-residence
    November 2018 - The John Rylands Library writer-in-residence

    Finally, I can announce that I am inaugural Writer-in-Residence at The John Rylands Library in Manchester. It’s fantastic news.
    How? I put together a proposal, & asked. The power of asking, indeed.

    Read the article in the University of Manchester magazine, here:

    “When I first moved to Manchester I was stunned to discover this incredible library with such a surprising history,” remembers Rosie Garland, singer with Leeds post-punk band The March Violets and writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library.
    “It’s always been one of my favourite places in Manchester and the idea that I’m now working in it and writing about it as the Library’s first writer-in- residence is a dream come true.”

    Read full article here
    https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/magazine/features/novel-library-research/

    Written on Monday, 12 November 2018 10:43