Displaying items by tag: rosie garland - Rosie Garland
Wednesday, 09 July 2014 10:21

17.7.2014 - VIXEN BOOK LAUNCH - London

Announcing the London launch of Rosie Garland's second novel, Vixen.
Along with Sarah Waters we at Gay's the Word are massive fans of Rosie Garland's beautiful writing and are incredibly happy to be hosting this publication day launch event for her second novel, Vixen.

Event entry £2, payable on the door. Complimentary refreshments. Please RSVP on Facebook.
Click here for Facebook event page

66 Marchmont Street,
London WC1N 1AB

The Novel:

It is 1349.

In Brauntone, where seagulls screech across the fields and the wind has a mind to change, Father Thomas arrives as the new priest. Determined to impress his congregation, he quells fears of the coming pestilence with promises of protection.

For Anne, the priest's arrival is an opportunity. Convinced a grand fate awaits, she moves in as Thomas's housekeeper, though hopeful of more. But his home is a place without love or kindness.

Meanwhile, a strange mute Maid is dancing with Death through the forest. She is discovered, washed up in the marshes, and taken in by Anne. Their friendship is to give Anne the chance of a happiness she thought she'd never know.

But soon the plague strikes Brauntone, spreading panic. And as the villagers' fear turns to anger, Thomas must sacrifice anything to restore their faith in him.

Praise for Rosie Garland's debut novel, The Palace of Curiosities

'Garland's lush prose is always a pleasure' Guardian
'An alternately brutal and beautiful story about love and belonging' Metro

'Bewitching' Good Housekeeping

'A jewel-box of a novel ... Garland is a real literary talent' Sarah Waters

'Reminds me of Angela Carter' Jenni Murray

'Fabulously strange historical debut... sheer, demented fun' Suzi Feay

Click for Gay's The Word website

Published in Gig List
Wednesday, 09 July 2014 10:10

16.7.2014 - VIXEN BOOK LAUNCH - Manchester

Announcing the Manchester launch of Rosie Garland's second novel, Vixen.
The Portico Library is hosting this PRE-publication day launch event. Bookshop provided by the lovely folk at Chorlton Bookshop – copies available a day before publication!

Contact the Portico Library for tickets 0161 236 6785
www.theportico.org.uk
Price tbc

The Novel:

It is 1349.

In Brauntone, where seagulls screech across the fields and the wind has a mind to change, Father Thomas arrives as the new priest. Determined to impress his congregation, he quells fears of the coming pestilence with promises of protection.

For Anne, the priest's arrival is an opportunity. Convinced a grand fate awaits, she moves in as Thomas's housekeeper, though hopeful of more. But his home is a place without love or kindness.

Meanwhile, a strange mute Maid is dancing with Death through the forest. She is discovered, washed up in the marshes, and taken in by Anne. Their friendship is to give Anne the chance of a happiness she thought she'd never know.

But soon the plague strikes Brauntone, spreading panic. And as the villagers' fear turns to anger, Thomas must sacrifice anything to restore their faith in him.

Praise for Rosie Garland's debut novel, The Palace of Curiosities

'Garland's lush prose is always a pleasure' Guardian
'An alternately brutal and beautiful story about love and belonging' Metro

'Bewitching' Good Housekeeping

'A jewel-box of a novel ... Garland is a real literary talent' Sarah Waters

'Reminds me of Angela Carter' Jenni Murray

'Fabulously strange historical debut... sheer, demented fun' Suzi Feay

Click link to go to The Portico Library events page

 

 

 

Published in Gig List
The March Violets are doing a little West Coast Tour this June!

First up: June 21 - Seattle – El Corazon.

June 22 - Portland - The Hive @ Star Theater.

June 25 - San Francisco - Death Guild @ DNA Lounge.

June 27 - Vegas - Scarlet @ LVCS.

June 28 - San Diego @ The Soda Bar.

June 29 - Los Angeles - Part Time Punks @ The Echo

Please see the Gig List page for full details!

Published in News
Authors Writing on Books
The Palace of Curiosities – reviewed by Max Scratchmann

Much as I want to like all of these books, there are, I'm afraid, a lot of fairly dull bodice-rippers and penny-dreadfuls lurking beneath the stunning cover art on the slew of mock-Victorian novels currently on the market, so it was with great joy that I discovered Rosie Garland's noir tale of life in a nineteenth-century freak show – The Palace of Curiosities.

Enticed by the gothic delicacy of cover art and then seduced by the Angela Carter comparison from Jenny Murray on the flyleaf, I delved into this novel with a mixture of anticipation and cautious scepticism – treating the alluring enticements to enter as nothing more than the world-weary siren call of an over zealous marketing man. But, miraculously, I was not disappointed this time, and though the wonderful Ms Garland, in fact, bears little resemblance to Angela Carter – she's far too original a voice to be a copy of anybody – The Palace of Curiosities is a dark and evocative exploration of the underbelly of Victorian society and a magic-realist journey through the fair grounds and freak shows that so fascinate this reviewer as a visual artist.

The novel follows the converging path of two outsiders, Eve the Lion Girl and Abel the Flayed Man – also known as Mr Lazarus – and takes us on an atmospheric journey that veers in and out of the (believable) supernatural and even manages a happy ending without ever once delving into sentimentality or sugary cliché. The writing is rich and verging on the poetic, and the characters are well-rounded and believable – Eve's story being particularly strong with a heady erotic undercurrent running throughout.

I very seldom resort to overblown kill-to-obtain-this-book soundbites, but this novel is a definite must-read. Highly recommended.

Max Scratchmann

Book: THE PALACE OF CURIOSITIES

Author: Rosie Garland

Publisher: HarperCollins

Click to go to Steve Savage's review site

Published in News
The March Violets plus guests
El Corazon
109 Eastlake Ave E,
Seattle, WA 98109,
United States

Doors Open: 8:00 PM

Tickets $15 ($17 on the night)

Ages 21+

Click here to buy tickets

+1 206-381-3094

Click for El Corazon venue website

Published in Gig List
Bella Agogo's Steampunk Show
The Sugar Club
8 Lower Leeson Street
Dublin 2
6787188

Friday, 16 May 2014

8pm – 11.30pm

Cost: €15.00 on the door

We're back. Making the impossible possible. Creating dreams and silliness. There's always something weird and wonderful about making shows, and this one will be no different. Travelling through time, freaks born of hybrid imaginings, fighter pilots, goddesses, damsels in corsets and bustles. Pocket watches and top hats and of course Inventions!

Bella A Go Go brings back the fabulous fantasy of Steampunk, a genre of mad science, invention, alternate histories and lots of fun.

Featuring:

Rosie Garland our Victorian/Steampunk author who will be reading from her book on the night and giving lots of unexpected delights!

Bella Agogo as our Master of Ceremonies

Azaria Starfire

Jonathan Walsh of Ether Productions aka Fabio Ego Deflatio

Fafa bellydance

Paddy Fagan aka Alter ego

Mo Cokley & troupe

Victorian/steampunk themed market with Crowzeye Jewellery N Sculpture and Ciaran Marcantonio selling his steampunk comics

Ticket Link

Click to buy tickets from secure link

Published in Gig List
Sunday, 30 March 2014 13:26

15.5.2014 - Museums at Night, Manchester

Museums at Night
The Portico Library
57 Mosley Street
Manchester
M2 3HY

Tel: 0161 236 6785

7-10pm

Rosie Garland will be giving a special late-night reading as part of the renowned Museums at Night Festival.

Other guests include the wonderful Jo Bell, plus Marli Roode & Rodge Glass.

Museums at Night, which explodes into life from 15 – 17 May 2014, is an annual UK-wide festival which seeks to encourage visitors into museums, galleries and heritage sites by throwing their doors open after hours and putting on special evening events.

Co-ordinated by non-profit cultural publishing organisation Culture24, Museums at Night is an opportunity for the cultural and heritage sector to come together around a single, simple campaign that is attractive to venues, audiences and the media.

Museums at Night ties in with the European campaign, La Nuit Des Musées, which takes place on Saturday 17th May 2014. In the UK, to allow venues greater flexibility, it will run over Thursday 15th to Saturday 17th May. The date is significant as it's the weekend nearest to 18 May, International Museums Day.

Click for Museums at Night website

Click for The Portico Library website

Published in Gig List
Monday, 24 March 2014 16:46

24.3.1014 - #mywritingprocess Blog Tour

#mywritingprocess – Blog Tour

I was asked to participate in this blog tour by wonderful wordsmith Steph Pike

Its purpose is to share current activities, link writers to their wider community and to spend a little time considering our latest projects - which could be either to tantalize readers or to give me the opportunity to chew over what exactly I'm doing. Either way, we get four questions to structure the post around:

1) What am I working on?

I grew up thinking there was something wrong with me, not helped by being surrounded by folk who encouraged that belief. There were many reasons, but here's the relevant one: I've always worked on more than one creative project at a time. Singing, poetry, fiction, painting my hall with a frieze of Egyptian goddesses... Do I bore easily? Am I a creativity junkie? Answers on a postcard.

After worrying myself stupid that it's 'wrong' to be like this, I've accepted it's how I am (and naysayers can bugger off). Poetry nourishes fiction, fiction nurtures song writing, and all of it feeds the soul. Plus, if I was only working on one thing, it'd be easy to, well, do nothing...

Right now I'm writing poetry using prompts from Jo Bell's inspirational 52 blog

  I'm gearing up for The March Violets tour dates in UK / Europe / USA.

I'm also doing the final edits for my second novel, Vixen, which is out June 17th. I'm lurching from fear (that it's absolute rubbish) to excitement (It's finished! I've really done it!).

Click to visit HarperCollins 'Vixen' page

2) How does my work differ from others of its genre?

I don't know if it does differ, or if it needs to. What is different, anyway?

Philosophical meanderings aside, one of the 'rules' I picked up in novel-writing workshops was never to use first person when writing weird or unusual characters, because the reader won't be able to identify with them.

But I'm fed up with marginalized voices being further marginalized via the semantic distancing of third-person. So, in my debut novel 'The Palace of Curiosities', I created Eve, a woman completely covered in hair. I was determined she should speak for herself rather than have her story filtered through 'normal' eyes. One of the most striking features of the wonderful feedback I've received is how much readers have identified with Eve. Rules are there to be bent into the shape we desire.

3) Why do I write what I do?

My mother used to ask, 'why can't you write nice stories?'

I don't explore dark themes as some kind of pose, or to be difficult, or challenging for the sake of it. I write what I write because that's what comes knocking. I write what interests me about the world.

Sure, I can produce something that doesn't fire me up (I've tried), but my heart's not in it. There's the rub: I write where my passions reside. I've chased myself in circles trying to second-guess what a publisher 'might' want and it was a disaster. There's no point twisting yourself into shapes trying to please. That way lies madness, and not the interesting, creative sort. Maybe it's one of the reasons it took me so long for my novels to get published. But that's a different blog

4) How does your writing process work?

I am inspired and moved by the wealth of creative strategies we use to get ourselves writing. I reckon there are as many processes as there are writers. I don't think it matters one iota whether you're a morning / afternoon / nocturnal writer, whether you prefer a pencil, an iPad or grind your own ink from freshly-roasted acorns. It's more important to find the process that works for you. Then use it.

Let's face it, every day I'm plagued with a million reasons to avoid writing - shopping, housework, TV, social networking, let alone my inner critic screaming how useless I am. Click to read my 'dealing with the inner critic' blog

If I have a routine it's easier to get the hell over myself and write. My writing process gives me an anchor, a lifebelt to hang onto and weather those storms.

Next week the blog tour adventure features three wonderful writers – Susan Elliott Wright, Cathy Bryant and Anne Caldwell.

Susan Elliot Wright is a London-born novelist who now lives in Sheffield, where she teaches creative writing and tries hard to take her own advice. Click for Susan's website / Click for Susan's blog

Cathy Bryant's poems and short stories have been published on five continents (just Antarctica holding out), and she is a former blogger for the Huffington Post. She has won nine literary awards including the Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Prize, and co-edited the anthologies Best of Manchester Poets vols. 1, 2 and 3. Her second poetry collection, Look at All the Women, will be launched later in 2014. See more at Cathy's website

Anne Caldwell is a poet and literature consultant. She works for NAWE, The University of Bolton, The Open University and runs workshops in schools and community settings. Contact Tel. 07818 052108 email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Her latest collection is Talking with the Dead, Cinnamon Press 2011.

Click to visit Anne's website

Published in News
Thursday, 20 March 2014 11:01

The Night Brother

The Night Brother

From the author of The Palace of Curiosities and Vixen comes a dazzling and provocative new novel of adventure, mystery and belonging. The Night Brother shifts tantalisingly between day and night, exploring questions of identity, sexual equality and how well we know ourselves. Perfect for fans of Angela Carter, Sarah Waters, Erin Morgenstern.
Praise from Stella Duffy - "A tumble of poetry, desire and passion... intriguing and delicious."

Rich are the delights of late nineteenth-century Manchester for young siblings Edie and Gnome. They bicker, banter, shout and scream their way through the city’s streets, embracing its charms and dangers. But as the pair mature, it is Gnome who revels in the night-time, while Edie is confined to the day. She wakes exhausted each morning, unable to quell a sickening sense of unease, and confused at living a half-life.
Reaching the cusp of adulthood, Edie’s confusion turns to resentment and she is determined to distance herself from Gnome once and for all. But can she ever be free from someone who knows her better than she knows herself?
Exploring the furthest limits of sexual and gender fluidity, this is a story about the vital importance of being honest with yourself. Every part of yourself. After all, no-one likes to be kept in the dark.

Available in all formats - hardback, paperback, audio, ebook.

The first reviews have come in for ‘The Night Brother’ – and they’re good. Wow!

"Echoes of Angela Carter's more fantastical fiction reverberate through this exhuberant tale... Garland's narrative is enjoyably energetic." - Nick Rennison, The Sunday Times 18.6.2017

"A rich and ambitious tale set in late Victorian Manchester... Garland's prose is a delight: playful and exhuberant. There are shades of Angela Carter in the mad world she creates... Full marks for style.' - Toni Senior, The Times 3.6.2017

Thank you to Happy Meerkat and Little Bookness Lane for loving my words.

“Once again I find myself lost in the reverie of Rosie Garland’s exquisite writing. Extraordinarily enchanting, The Night Brother’s emotional bounty caresses each page… Embracing the intimacies and complexities of the heart and soul, The Night Brother doesn’t feel like a story, but a delectable gift. All that remains is for me to offer a thunderous round of applause for what is simply an expressive, breath-taking wonder.”
Little Bookness Lane – read the full text here
https://littlebooknesslane.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/book-review-the-night-brother-by-rosie-garland/

“The Night Brother is a wonderful historical fiction novel with an amazing and intriguing twist… From the moment I read the first page I was hooked… A real exciting and also thought-provoking page-turner that I can really recommend.”
Happy Meerkat – read the full text here
https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1888724819

Published in Fiction
THE MARCH VIOLETS HEADLINE CONVERGENCE XX
Bottom Lounge
1375 W. Lake Street,
Chicago IL 60607,
United States

Welcome to Convergence Twenty Chicago! We are extremely honored, dark denizens of the Internet, that our city has again been chosen to continue the fine once-a-decade tradition of being your hosts for a weekend you'll never forget! Sincere thanks to all who voted for Convergence Twenty Chicago.

The March Violets are one of those bands.

Formed in Leeds in the post punk era at the very start of the 80s, they were one of the 4 dark Northern Bands that are often blamed for starting the Gothic scene, The Danse Society, The Sisters of Mercy, The March Violets, and The Southern Death Cult. The Violets released a series of singles that still fill the darker dance floors around the world, the most played being "Snakedance" and "Walk into the Sun."

Three original members reformed in 2008 for a reunion, and since then the Violets have done a few rare concerts, headlined some festivals, and finally managed to write and record their first proper album.

They will be playing some old classics and some new ones from the Made Glorious album. Strangely enough, people who have seen The March Violets in this century say they sound exactly the same as they did back in the early 80's, the Violets agree.

The March Violets' appearance at C20 (their first C*) will mark their first time in the U.S. since 1987, and the first time ever with all three original members -- promising a rare performance from a legendary band that has actually managed to evolve, yet retain their original dark brilliance.

"Play Loud, Play Purple."

WEBPAGE: Click link for Convergence website

TICKETS & ENQUIRIES: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Click for official March Violets site

Published in Gig List

News and Events

  • 10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today
    10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today

    I’m thrilled to announce that Val McDermid has selected me as one of the 10 most compelling LGBTQI+ writers working in the UK today!

    Val said: “These writers are writing for everyone. These are not words for a niche readership. These are not writings for a ghetto. These are the works of writers who have something to say that can be – and should be – heard by as many people as possible.”

    She continued: “Auden was wrong when he claimed “poetry makes nothing happen”. Words do change the world, reader by reader. They open our eyes, they provoke thought. The work of these 10 writers… will awaken in us fresh delight in the wonder of words.”

    The list was commissioned by the National Centre for Writing and British Council, supported by Arts Council England as part of a two-year programme to promote writing from the UK to an international audience. It also includes the amazing Colette Bryce, Juno Dawson, Juliet Jacques, Keith Jarrett, Kirsty Logan, Andrew McMillan, Fiona Mozley, Mary Paulson-Ellis & Luke Turner.

    The Guardian - The Word Is Out. Val McDermid selects Britain's 10 most outstanding lgbtq writers

    Written on Wednesday, 14 August 2019 08:44
  • 20.6.2019 - Peterloo: massacre or riot? The John Rylands Library
    20.6.2019 - Peterloo: massacre or riot? The John Rylands Library
    Peterloo – massacre or riot?

    On June 20th 2019, The John Rylands Library staged a live performance event to mark the bicentenary of the Peterloo Massacre. It was a first for the library and I was excited to take the part of Jemima Bamford – one of the thousands of men, women and children who gathered at St Peter’s Field in August 1819. I donned bonnet and shawl and created a speech, imagining how she might have spoken out against the actions of the militia, who charged into an unarmed crowd, and murdered up to 23 people.

    Then joined by 5 other actors, I took part in a public debate as we decide: was Peterloo a massacre or a riot? At the end of the debate, votes were cast, and Manchester decided overwhelmingly – massacre.

    Written on Sunday, 21 July 2019 10:32
  • 8.6.2019 - Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate, Wave-Gotik Treffen
    8.6.2019 - Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate, Wave-Gotik Treffen
    Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate at Wave-Gotik Treffen

    The high point of WGT 2019 was being invited to be guest vocalist with The Bellwether Syndicate from Chicago! Rocking out to a special rendition of The March Violets track ‘Snake Dance’…
    The gig on Saturday 8th June 2019 at Taubchenthal, Leipzig was packed out – and what a crowd…

    A great pleasure to work with William Faith, Sarah Rose (aka Scary Lady Sarah), keyboards Phil Destefano, bassist Paul Sin & drummer extraordinaire Stevyn Grey

    https://www.wave-gotik-treffen.de/ro/go4it.php?id=197&loc=en

    Written on Sunday, 21 July 2019 10:20
  • 'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    How to ask for a residency

    Since I wrote about the Power of Asking, I’ve been heartened by how many writers have told me they’re going to ask for Writers’ Residencies too. There are plenty of questions: What do you say? What do you ask for? This blog offers a few suggestions.

    Where do you want your residency to be?
    Chip shop, bus stop, lighthouse, theatre, cemetery. The choice is yours. Think of where you’d love to write. It may be a place you pass every day on the way to work, or somewhere you’ve stumbled on by chance. Perhaps you have a connection already. For example, when I was invited to read at The John Rylands Library, I fell in love with this Mancunian gem. It sparked a train of thought…

    What do you want to do?
    I’ve a pretty simple plan: my next novel is set in The John Rylands and I’m exploring what it’s like to write ‘on site’, drawing inspiration from the spirit of the place. You’ll have your own ideas. It’s a wonderful opportunity to try something new, with time to focus on your writing in an inspiring workspace. The clearer you are about what you’d like to create and how it’s connected to the venue you’ve chosen, the better. Do your research, and put together a proposal. I’ve broken this down below.

    How long is a residency?
    Weeks, months, or a year – it’s largely up to you and the organisation. My residency is running for a calendar year; time to produce a first draft of the novel. I’ve committed to being on site for one day a week, but can’t keep away from the place…

    What can you offer?
    As well as being clear about what you want to achieve, think about what you can offer your host organisation. Ideas can include giving talks, workshops, writing tutorials or readings, and writing blogs on the progress of the residency. You might produce a poem etched in the window, or devise a grand finale performance. There’s no limit.
    If you’re unsure, ask for advice from writer friends (or friends of friends) who’ve done residencies in the past. If you don’t know any – ask the internet. Social media can be a lot more supportive than you might imagine.

    How do you get an introduction?
    You’ll need to approach your chosen organisation to find out of they’re interested in your idea. I asked writer friends for signposting, and got an introduction. People were only too pleased to help, a warm reminder that we’re in this together. There’s a community of writers out there, and we are pretty groovy people.

    What about money?
    This blog is about building your own residency from scratch, not applying for a funded opportunity. So, when the question of money and payment arose (pretty much the first question), I said no. Nowhere has money for residencies, unless it’s a regular gig like The Forestry Commission
    And, unsurprisingly, these residencies are massively oversubscribed.
    A personal tip is to source funding elsewhere. I applied to The Arts Council - Successfully.

    Then again – aim for the stars! One writer told me she’s asking for a residency at a private members’ club with buckets of money. Needless to say, she IS asking them to fund it.

    What’s the worst that can happen?
    Fear of the word no can stop us asking in the first place. Your chosen venue may say no. But they’re not going to poke you with forks. Trust me on this one. And in the words of Steve Jobs: “Most people don't get experiences because they never ask. I've never found anybody who didn't want to help me when I've asked them for help.”

    Keep going. Keep asking.

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2019/02/26/how-to-ask-for-a-residency/

    Written on Sunday, 24 March 2019 10:08
  • 'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library
    'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library

    As part of my Writer’s Residency at The John Rylands Library, I’m writing a series of blogs… here’s the first – The Power of Asking.

    “I’ve just been appointed the first writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library. How did I manage this wonderful achievement? I asked.

    Sounds easy.

    It wasn’t. If you’re anything like me (and the longer I live, the more I realise I’m not alone), asking is far more difficult than it sounds.

    Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Unless you were born with a set of silver spoons in your mouth (which is everyone reading this, right?), then you’ve worked out that opportunities don’t fall magically into your lap. You’ve had to work hard to get where you are.

    I like what Julia Cameron (author of the inspirational ‘The Artists Way’) says: “Pray to catch the bus, then run as fast as you can.” It’s a reminder to put myself into the path of opportunities. The bus does not come to the front door. I have to leave the house, and darn well run for it.

    I have to take a deep breath, and ask. So, why is it so difficult?

    Here’s my take. I grew up with a spectacularly unhelpful dictum: Ask, don’t get. Don’t ask, don’t want. I shared this with friends recently, and was shocked to discover it’s very common. I end up stuck in a bizarre Catch 22 situation, thinking that if I have to ask for something, then I don’t deserve it. Or, that I must to wait for someone else to ask me. The most I’m allowed to do is stand around looking hopeful.
    This lose-lose mentality is combined with a vicious internal critic. I call her Mavis (I’ve blogged about her here and run Anti-Mavis workshops). She never, ever says anything nice. If someone says they like my writing, Mavis jumps in and whispers ‘they’re only being nice.’ In fact, she can be neatly summed up by this great Savage Chickens cartoon (Doug Savage):

    Naturally, my internal critic undermined any notion that somewhere as amazing as The John Rylands Library would want the likes of me.

    So – standing up and asking for what I want can be pretty damn hard. I’m swamped with fears of rejection, coming over as needy, an underachiever, someone who’s failed because they need to ask.

    Luckily, this isn’t a poor-me blog.

    Years ago I decided that I was not going to let fear of rejection stop me living a life that is too darn short as it is. I take inspiration from Jia Jiang, whose TED talk about dealing with rejection is well worth 15 minutes of anyone’s time.

    So, however hard it is to ask, to put myself forward, to send that manuscript to a competition or agent – I take several deep breaths and do it. In the words of Susan Jeffers: ‘feel the fear and do it anyway’.

    And here’s the good news. The John Rylands Library is delighted to have a writer-in-residence. Correction: The John Rylands Library is delighted to have me as a writer-in-residence.

    I have told Mavis to put that in her pipe and smoke it.

    Coming next – what I asked for, and how to ask for a residency.”

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2018/12/10/the-power-of-asking/

    Written on Saturday, 02 March 2019 15:36