Displaying items by tag: rosie garland - Rosie Garland
Wednesday, 17 December 2014 11:26

29.1.2015 - great weather for MEDIA, Manchester

great weather for MEDIA

When: Thursday 29th January 2015, 7.30pm
Where: The Castle Hotel,
66 Oldham Street,
M4 1LE Manchester, United Kingdom
Tickets: Free event


Info: Click for FB event page

 

Featuring BigCharlie Poet, Cathy Bryant, Maya Chowdhry, Rosie Garland, Jackie Hagan, Kieren King, Sarah Miller, Jane Ormerod, Steph Pike, Gerry Potter, and Rebecca Audra Smith

 

Join great weather for MEDIA for a crazy-good evening of poetry and spoken word from the UK and New York City.

great weather for MEDIA is an independent small press focusing on the unpredictable, the fearless, the bright, the dark, and the innovative. We are based in New York City and showcase national and international poets and writers. Submissions for our print anthology open October 15 to January 15 every year.
www.greatweatherformedia.com

To submit to our next anthology, send work by January 15 Click to submit your work

 

Although a relative newcomer to Spoken Word, BIGCHARLIE POET's work ranges from the odd through the observational to the very personal. His notebook is his constant companion.

Fifty percent Spike Milligan and fifty percent Sylvia Plath (but not necessarily the talented halves), CATHY BRYANT has won thirteen literary awards and had two well-received books published.

MAYA CHOWDHRY found her voice on CND marches; sewed it into poetry and queer politics. She has inTer-aCted, partiCipated, narRated to make still, moving and interactive words and imagery for page, stage, web and waves.

ROSIE GARLAND has always been a cuckoo in the nest. She is an eclectic writer and performer and sings in post-punk band The March Violets. Her latest solo collection is "Everything Must Go" (Holland Park Press). Her debut novel "The Palace of Curiosities" was published by HarperCollins UK in 2013 and her second novel, Vixen released in June 2014. Find her poetry in great weather for MEDIA's latest anthology "I Let Go of the Stars in My Hand". http://www.rosiegarland.com/

JACKIE HAGAN was brought up on broken biscuits by hecklers. www.jackiehagan.weebly.com

Multiple slam winning host of Evidently and the Word War Slam series KIEREN KING grew up in the "posh end" of Salford writing bad love poetry in the back of his English book. A heathen and an anarchist, he must be approached with caution at all times. Tickling him behind the ear has been proven to soothe him.

SARAH MILLER is a poet, theatre deviser and playwright with poems published in anthologies and over twenty plays produced. She's passionate about Jane Austen, vegan cake, tea sets and all things gothic and is also partial to big frocks and hats. She is currently working on a joint poetry collection with Melanie Rees, which is being published in 2015.

JANE ORMEROD was born on the south coast of England and now lives in New York City. She is a founding editor at great weather for MEDIA. Jane performs across the United States and beyond. Her books include "Welcome to the Museum of Cattle" and "Recreational Vehicles on Fire" (both from Three Rooms Press). http://www.janeormerod.com/

STEPH PIKE is an activist and performance poet. Her poetry is urgent, topical and eloquent. She has performed extensively across the country and has been published in several anthologies. Her first collection, "Full of the Deep Bits was published in 2010. She is passionate about the transformative power of poetry, both personal and political.

Ex-grande dame of British poetry and literary King Dong of the contemporary scene, GERRY POTTER's "The Chronicles of Folly Butler" is out now with Flapjack Press. https://www.facebook.com/gerry.potterpoet

REBECCA AUDRA SMITH drags words up from the ocean's floor. They are strange rusty things which she attempts to shine.

 

Published in Gig List
Wednesday, 17 December 2014 11:21

15.1.2015 - Hit The Ode, Birmingham

Apples and Snakes presents
Hit the Ode


Hit the Ode brings the most exciting poets from the region, the country and the world to the heart of Birmingham. Join us! We have poems. Poems written on the backs of lottery tickets and on the margins of holy books; poems which yell through covered mouths and whisper through megaphones; poems which send you emails every day and poems which are not available to take your call right now. Good poems. Come and get them.

Line-up: Rosie Garland plus Dominic Berry from Manchester & Alexandre Sa from Portugal!

A very few open mic slots will be available! For more info, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
When: Thursday 15th January 2015, 7.30pm
Where: The Victoria, 48 John Bright St, Birmingham B1 1BN
Tickets: £5
Info: www.thevictoriabirmingham.co.uk / Facebook

Open mic: half of the open mic slots available via email (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), the other half can be claimed on the door on the day of the event.

Published in Gig List

As if it wasn't exciting enough to be invited to speak at The British Library on its Gothic panel on 9th November...

 

I was invited to talk on the Steve Lamacq show on BBC Radio 6, live from the Library! Click the link to hear me ramble on about the fantastic Gothic- themed exhibition, writing gothic and singing in The March Violets.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04pgz3g

 

 

Published in News
Sunday, 23 November 2014 13:19

20.11.2014 - A passion for libraries

I was delighted to be invited to read at The Feminist Library - and they invited me to write a blog about my passion for libraries!

 

"I wish I could wax lyrical about all the reasons why I'm a fan of libraries – but there's neither space nor time. However, take it as read: I'm passionate about libraries. I'm passionate about feminism. There, I said it. Out and proud.

My feminism can be summed up as "the radical notion that women are people" (Marie Shear, 1986. For the history of this misattribution see http://www.beverlymcphail.com/feminismradicalnotion.html ). I have an equally radical belief that books – and by extension, education – should be freely available to all, and not just the wealthy. There's nowt so radical as a reader. Malala Yousafzai was right when she said "Extremists have shown what frightens them the most: a girl with a book".

Libraries are exciting, magical, transformative and dangerous.
A happy childhood memory is the Saturday trip to the local library. I chose four new books, which were mine for a whole week! And wonder of wonders: the Saturday after there were four more, then four more. I could never read them all... I explored new worlds, I learned new things. And here's the dangerous part: I thought new thoughts. It was the beginning of a love affair that's still going strong.

Which brings me to my recent visit to The Feminist Library, tucked into a University building on Westminster Bridge Road. I was honoured to read from my own work in such a great setting. It's a treasure trove of books, pamphlets, magazines and much more: many out of print, rare, if not unique. As I scanned the spines I recognised things I'd once owned but were lost, stolen or strayed over years of house moves in and out of the UK.

This is part of the power and importance of The Feminist Library and archives like it. We assume that 'somebody, somewhere' has these books and that we will never lose sight of them. It's a dangerous assumption. All too often it is simply the determination and dedication of rare individuals that stops such vital material from disappearing.

Anyone who tries to tell you that we don't need libraries any more because 'everything is online' is either woefully misinformed or lying. Besides – real, solid, here and now books can't be deleted at the click of a button or lost in a glitch in a 'hacker-proof' cloud. Libraries are time machines to the past and stargates to the future.

The Feminist Library celebrates its 40th birthday in 2015. At times it's been a bumpy ride. We need it more than ever in the face of the undermining of education for all, the wholesale eradication of public libraries and the ongoing struggle against misogyny.

I'll leave the last word to Neil Gaiman, another fervent advocate. "Libraries are about freedom. Freedom to read, freedom of ideas, freedom of communication".

 

http://feministlibrary.co.uk/2014/11/guest-post-rosie-garland-a-passion-for-libraries/

 

Published in News
Tuesday, 28 October 2014 10:42

26.10.2014 - Gothic Manchester Festival 2014

A stellar day in the neo-gothic pomp and circumstance of John Rylands Library's magnificent Historic Reading Room. It's been a dream of mine to read there... and dreams come true.
A delicious highlight of the event was the specially designed (and rather foxy) cake by the talented Annabel de Vetten of Conjuror's Kitchen.
Click to go to Manchester Gothic Festival page

Published in News
Thursday, 16 October 2014 12:39

30.11.2014 - Rally & Broad! Glasgow

Stereo
Renfield Lane,
Glasgow
Doors 2.30, show 3-5.30pm

For the times when it all falls intae place... Rally & Broad present: The Eureka Moment! Helping us oot in fair Glasgow, we have...

AIDAN MOFFAT! Multi-talented writer, author, spoken word performer, musician, producer... we could go on. Our headline act for this month is the fabulous Aidan Moffat!

STRANGE BLUE DREAMS! A spooky musical backdrop of gospel, early rock 'n' roll, R&B, rockabilly and country...in other words: Strange Blue Dreams indeed. **** (Glasgow Herald)

ROSIE GARLAND! Born in London to a runaway teenager, Rosie has always been a cuckoo in the nest. She's an eclectic writer and performer, ranging from singing in post-punk gothic band The March Violets, through touring with the Subversive Stitch exhibition in the 90s to her alter-ego Rosie Lugosi the Vampire Queen, cabaret chanteuse and mistress of ceremonies.

MARTIN O'CONNOR! A vital new-talent as a performer, theatre-maker and spoken word act, O'Connor's stream-of-consciousness spoken word performances captivate and delight audiences. A finalist in Rally & Broad's Commonwealth Cultural Programme Slam, July 2014.

CHRISSY BARNACLE! Chrissy Barnacle is a singer-songwriter hailing from the grimey shores of the Clyde whose yearning and often fantastical lyrics are brimming with turmoil and optimism.

http://rallyandbroad.com/

Published in Gig List
Vixen is longlisted for The Green Carnation prize 2014!

The thirteen strong longlist of titles celebrating LGBT writing have been announced after several days of debates between the judges over an exceptional list of submissions, the most the prize has seen in its history to date. This list takes us from fairytale lands to the call centres of Scotland, from Calcutta to Russia and includes fiction, memoir, essays, short stories, non-fiction and the graphic novel.

Chair of the judges for 2014, journalist Kaite Welsh said of the longlist "The judging panel for this year's prize were in luck – some of the most dynamic and exciting books from the past twelve months have been from LGBT authors. Out of those, we've compiled an amazing longlist that should be on everyone's to-read list. The 2014 Green Carnation Prize has coincided with a bumper year for LGBT writing from established authors to new voices. Whittling the list down to 13 was difficult and enjoyable, and we're confident that picking the shortlist from such a great collection will be just as challenging."

Click to go to Green Carnation Prize site

 

Published in News

The Writers' Toolkit 2014
November 29th
9:30 am - 4:00 pm

The University of Birmingham,
Edgbaston, Birmingham,
West Midlands B15 2TT

£37 / £31 (includes lunch)

The Writers' Toolkit is our annual writer networking conference for emerging and established writers. The conference takes place over one day and offers writers the pick of sixteen sessions with industry professionals. Sessions cover topics ranging from working with publishers and agents, working in schools and community settings, writing for television and film, teaching creative writing, developing and getting funding for writing projects and residencies and making the internet work for you. Speakers are drawn from a wide range of national and regional organisations and partners including the BBC, Birmingham Rep, National Association of Writers in Education, The Arvon Foundation, The British Council and various publishers, universities and arts organisations. The conference is a wonderful opportunity for writers to meet, share ideas and make new contacts.
The full programme of sessions will be announced closer to the day.
How to Book:
To book, please contact our box office, The Box on 0121 245 4455.
Click to go to Writing West Midlands site

http://www.writingwestmidlands.org/

 

Published in Gig List

Saturday 15th November – Sunday 16th November
The Palace Hotel
Oxford St,
Manchester M60 7HA

 

Saturday 15th November, 5pm – 6.15pm
Writing poetry and writing lyrics – with Si Denbigh & Rosie Garland
What is the synergy between poetry and lyrics? Can one form feed and inform the other?
This workshop features practical exercises to get words on the page, plus time for discussion. Please feel free to bring your own lyrics / poetry to play with!

Sunday 16th November, 2.30pm – 3.45pm
Sub-culture (Gothic themed) panel, chaired by John Robb – with Rosie Garland, Natasha Scharf and David McWilliams.

Click to go to Louder Than Words site

Published in Gig List
Friday, 19 September 2014 13:42

10.11.2014 - The Feminist Library, London

Writing Histories – reading with Rosie Garland
Details tbc
5 Westminster Bridge Rd,
London SE1 7XW
The Feminist Library was founded as the Women's Research and Resources Centre in 1975 by a group of women concerned about the future of the Fawcett Library to ensure that the history of the women's liberation movement survived.
Click to go to The Feminist Library site

Published in Gig List

News and Events

  • 10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today
    10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today

    I’m thrilled to announce that Val McDermid has selected me as one of the 10 most compelling LGBTQI+ writers working in the UK today!

    Val said: “These writers are writing for everyone. These are not words for a niche readership. These are not writings for a ghetto. These are the works of writers who have something to say that can be – and should be – heard by as many people as possible.”

    She continued: “Auden was wrong when he claimed “poetry makes nothing happen”. Words do change the world, reader by reader. They open our eyes, they provoke thought. The work of these 10 writers… will awaken in us fresh delight in the wonder of words.”

    The list was commissioned by the National Centre for Writing and British Council, supported by Arts Council England as part of a two-year programme to promote writing from the UK to an international audience. It also includes the amazing Colette Bryce, Juno Dawson, Juliet Jacques, Keith Jarrett, Kirsty Logan, Andrew McMillan, Fiona Mozley, Mary Paulson-Ellis & Luke Turner.

    The Guardian - The Word Is Out. Val McDermid selects Britain's 10 most outstanding lgbtq writers

    Written on Wednesday, 14 August 2019 08:44
  • 20.6.2019 - Peterloo: massacre or riot? The John Rylands Library
    20.6.2019 - Peterloo: massacre or riot? The John Rylands Library
    Peterloo – massacre or riot?

    On June 20th 2019, The John Rylands Library staged a live performance event to mark the bicentenary of the Peterloo Massacre. It was a first for the library and I was excited to take the part of Jemima Bamford – one of the thousands of men, women and children who gathered at St Peter’s Field in August 1819. I donned bonnet and shawl and created a speech, imagining how she might have spoken out against the actions of the militia, who charged into an unarmed crowd, and murdered up to 23 people.

    Then joined by 5 other actors, I took part in a public debate as we decide: was Peterloo a massacre or a riot? At the end of the debate, votes were cast, and Manchester decided overwhelmingly – massacre.

    Written on Sunday, 21 July 2019 10:32
  • 8.6.2019 - Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate, Wave-Gotik Treffen
    8.6.2019 - Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate, Wave-Gotik Treffen
    Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate at Wave-Gotik Treffen

    The high point of WGT 2019 was being invited to be guest vocalist with The Bellwether Syndicate from Chicago! Rocking out to a special rendition of The March Violets track ‘Snake Dance’…
    The gig on Saturday 8th June 2019 at Taubchenthal, Leipzig was packed out – and what a crowd…

    A great pleasure to work with William Faith, Sarah Rose (aka Scary Lady Sarah), keyboards Phil Destefano, bassist Paul Sin & drummer extraordinaire Stevyn Grey

    https://www.wave-gotik-treffen.de/ro/go4it.php?id=197&loc=en

    Written on Sunday, 21 July 2019 10:20
  • 'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    How to ask for a residency

    Since I wrote about the Power of Asking, I’ve been heartened by how many writers have told me they’re going to ask for Writers’ Residencies too. There are plenty of questions: What do you say? What do you ask for? This blog offers a few suggestions.

    Where do you want your residency to be?
    Chip shop, bus stop, lighthouse, theatre, cemetery. The choice is yours. Think of where you’d love to write. It may be a place you pass every day on the way to work, or somewhere you’ve stumbled on by chance. Perhaps you have a connection already. For example, when I was invited to read at The John Rylands Library, I fell in love with this Mancunian gem. It sparked a train of thought…

    What do you want to do?
    I’ve a pretty simple plan: my next novel is set in The John Rylands and I’m exploring what it’s like to write ‘on site’, drawing inspiration from the spirit of the place. You’ll have your own ideas. It’s a wonderful opportunity to try something new, with time to focus on your writing in an inspiring workspace. The clearer you are about what you’d like to create and how it’s connected to the venue you’ve chosen, the better. Do your research, and put together a proposal. I’ve broken this down below.

    How long is a residency?
    Weeks, months, or a year – it’s largely up to you and the organisation. My residency is running for a calendar year; time to produce a first draft of the novel. I’ve committed to being on site for one day a week, but can’t keep away from the place…

    What can you offer?
    As well as being clear about what you want to achieve, think about what you can offer your host organisation. Ideas can include giving talks, workshops, writing tutorials or readings, and writing blogs on the progress of the residency. You might produce a poem etched in the window, or devise a grand finale performance. There’s no limit.
    If you’re unsure, ask for advice from writer friends (or friends of friends) who’ve done residencies in the past. If you don’t know any – ask the internet. Social media can be a lot more supportive than you might imagine.

    How do you get an introduction?
    You’ll need to approach your chosen organisation to find out of they’re interested in your idea. I asked writer friends for signposting, and got an introduction. People were only too pleased to help, a warm reminder that we’re in this together. There’s a community of writers out there, and we are pretty groovy people.

    What about money?
    This blog is about building your own residency from scratch, not applying for a funded opportunity. So, when the question of money and payment arose (pretty much the first question), I said no. Nowhere has money for residencies, unless it’s a regular gig like The Forestry Commission
    And, unsurprisingly, these residencies are massively oversubscribed.
    A personal tip is to source funding elsewhere. I applied to The Arts Council - Successfully.

    Then again – aim for the stars! One writer told me she’s asking for a residency at a private members’ club with buckets of money. Needless to say, she IS asking them to fund it.

    What’s the worst that can happen?
    Fear of the word no can stop us asking in the first place. Your chosen venue may say no. But they’re not going to poke you with forks. Trust me on this one. And in the words of Steve Jobs: “Most people don't get experiences because they never ask. I've never found anybody who didn't want to help me when I've asked them for help.”

    Keep going. Keep asking.

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2019/02/26/how-to-ask-for-a-residency/

    Written on Sunday, 24 March 2019 10:08
  • 'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library
    'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library

    As part of my Writer’s Residency at The John Rylands Library, I’m writing a series of blogs… here’s the first – The Power of Asking.

    “I’ve just been appointed the first writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library. How did I manage this wonderful achievement? I asked.

    Sounds easy.

    It wasn’t. If you’re anything like me (and the longer I live, the more I realise I’m not alone), asking is far more difficult than it sounds.

    Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Unless you were born with a set of silver spoons in your mouth (which is everyone reading this, right?), then you’ve worked out that opportunities don’t fall magically into your lap. You’ve had to work hard to get where you are.

    I like what Julia Cameron (author of the inspirational ‘The Artists Way’) says: “Pray to catch the bus, then run as fast as you can.” It’s a reminder to put myself into the path of opportunities. The bus does not come to the front door. I have to leave the house, and darn well run for it.

    I have to take a deep breath, and ask. So, why is it so difficult?

    Here’s my take. I grew up with a spectacularly unhelpful dictum: Ask, don’t get. Don’t ask, don’t want. I shared this with friends recently, and was shocked to discover it’s very common. I end up stuck in a bizarre Catch 22 situation, thinking that if I have to ask for something, then I don’t deserve it. Or, that I must to wait for someone else to ask me. The most I’m allowed to do is stand around looking hopeful.
    This lose-lose mentality is combined with a vicious internal critic. I call her Mavis (I’ve blogged about her here and run Anti-Mavis workshops). She never, ever says anything nice. If someone says they like my writing, Mavis jumps in and whispers ‘they’re only being nice.’ In fact, she can be neatly summed up by this great Savage Chickens cartoon (Doug Savage):

    Naturally, my internal critic undermined any notion that somewhere as amazing as The John Rylands Library would want the likes of me.

    So – standing up and asking for what I want can be pretty damn hard. I’m swamped with fears of rejection, coming over as needy, an underachiever, someone who’s failed because they need to ask.

    Luckily, this isn’t a poor-me blog.

    Years ago I decided that I was not going to let fear of rejection stop me living a life that is too darn short as it is. I take inspiration from Jia Jiang, whose TED talk about dealing with rejection is well worth 15 minutes of anyone’s time.

    So, however hard it is to ask, to put myself forward, to send that manuscript to a competition or agent – I take several deep breaths and do it. In the words of Susan Jeffers: ‘feel the fear and do it anyway’.

    And here’s the good news. The John Rylands Library is delighted to have a writer-in-residence. Correction: The John Rylands Library is delighted to have me as a writer-in-residence.

    I have told Mavis to put that in her pipe and smoke it.

    Coming next – what I asked for, and how to ask for a residency.”

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2018/12/10/the-power-of-asking/

    Written on Saturday, 02 March 2019 15:36