Displaying items by tag: lgbt - Rosie Garland
Sunday, 25 August 2019 16:02

23.9.2019 - BICONIC, Manchester

Biconic - Spoken Word for Bi Visibility Day

The Font
7-9 New Wakefield St,
M1 5NP Manchester

19:00-01:00
Donation on the door PAYF

Join us for a spectacular charity night of spoken word from some of the North West's finest bi and pan identifying poets and writers! We will have poems, games, unicorn dress up, cocktails, mocktails, prizes and an amazing DJ to take us through til 1am.

LOOK AT OUR INCREDIBLE LINE UP:
Jackie Hagan
Rosie Garland
Kinsman
Maz Hedgehog
Genevieve Walsh
J Lythgoe
Mica Sinclair
Bob Horton
Xavier Velastin
Jane Claire Bradley
Janey Colbourne
Bryony Bates
Midnight Shelley
Andy Pilkington
Bonnie Hancell

Plus your comperes Drew Lawson and Helen Darby

On the decks: The sublime JESS ROSE
All proceeds will be split equally between Biscuit and Biphoria
Unicorn cocktails from Font - one pound from every sale to charity
Come and be super visible bi and pan and allies with us!!

Published in Gig List

I’m thrilled to announce that Val McDermid has selected me as one of the 10 most compelling LGBTQI+ writers working in the UK today!

Val said: “These writers are writing for everyone. These are not words for a niche readership. These are not writings for a ghetto. These are the works of writers who have something to say that can be – and should be – heard by as many people as possible.”

She continued: “Auden was wrong when he claimed “poetry makes nothing happen”. Words do change the world, reader by reader. They open our eyes, they provoke thought. The work of these 10 writers… will awaken in us fresh delight in the wonder of words.”

The list was commissioned by the National Centre for Writing and British Council, supported by Arts Council England as part of a two-year programme to promote writing from the UK to an international audience. It also includes the amazing Colette Bryce, Juno Dawson, Juliet Jacques, Keith Jarrett, Kirsty Logan, Andrew McMillan, Fiona Mozley, Mary Paulson-Ellis & Luke Turner.

The Guardian - The Word Is Out. Val McDermid selects Britain's 10 most outstanding lgbtq writers

Published in News
Tuesday, 23 July 2019 14:58

11.8.2019 - Antwerp Queer Arts Fest

Antwerp Queer Arts Festival

De Studio
Maarschalk Gerardstraat 4,
2000 Antwerpen,
Belgium

Lecture / Cabaret
13:30 - 15:00

Rosie Garland, writer and cabaret performer from Manchester (UK), will tell us about the suffragette movement in the UK in a lecture, and jazz it up with a Victorian suffragette song or two.
After her talk she is invited to Fleur Pieret’s salon, where Els Flour of het Archief- en Onderzoekscentrum voor Vrouwengeschiedenis (AVG-Carhif) will address the similarities and differences with the struggle for women’s vote in Belgium.

From there we take it to a salon discussion on which battles still need to be fought today. For this discussion, we invited several panellist, all believing in the benefits of an intersectional feminism and will discuss what that means to them.

Clarice M.D. Gargard (NL) is journalist and UN-Women Representative. In March 2019, her documentary film Daddy and the Warlord (director Shamira Raphaela) was released. The doc deals with her family background and the Liberian civil wars. Her book ‘Drakendochter’ (Arbeiderspers),will be launched in september 2019.

Ilse Ghekiere (BE) is a dancer and activist (#Wetoo, ENGAGEMENT). In 2017 Ghekiere received a grant from the Flemish government in order to research sexism within the Belgian dance scene. She is author of several #metoo-related articles, amongst which #Wetoo: What Dancers Talk About When They Talk About Sexism. She founded ENGAGEMENT, an artist movement that puts issues concerning sexual harrasment, sexism and abuse of power in the art world on the agenda.

Simon(e) van Saarloos (NL) is a writer, performer and philosopher. Her manifest “Het monogame drama” (by August available in English as “Playing Monogamy”) did not go unnoticed. In September the essay “Herdenk herdacht”, about queer oblivion, white remembering and physically commemorating.

AQAF is an international arts festival, questioning gender and sexual diversity, that takes place each year at the beginning of August. Entering its sixth edition, each year we have programmed both local performers and international talent within a variety of art forms: music, literature, film, dance, theatre, exposition, performance…

https://www.queerarts.be/sunday-august-11?fbclid=IwAR2ASQb7qtlvhjDp8hZoZUYu2ZvGRQl4wpbqH2D-TXh-vMHSZsKq2KlOY1E

Published in Gig List
LGBT+ tour of The John Rylands Library

The John Rylands Library
150 Deansgate
Manchester, M3 3EH

Saturday, July 27, 2019
11:15 AM 1:30 PM
Free event

Towering over Deansgate, The John Rylands Library is one of Manchester’s most iconic buildings.
Imposing? Yep. Daunting? Sure. Ever ventured inside? Think it’s not the place for ‘you’?

Come on this specially-designed tour with Manchester writer Rosie Garland. Nominated for the Polari Prize & winner of the Coop LGBT Novel of the Year, her latest book ‘The Night Brother’ has been described as ‘Orlando meets Jekyll & Hyde’.

Discover how she’s Queering the Rylands, using the collections to inspire her new novel. Find out about ghosts, and the woman who built the library. How we can write our queer stories into new spaces.
Join us and put a queer pin in the map of Manchester.
Here be dragons!

https://superbia.org.uk/events/lgbt-tour-of-the-john-rylands-library

Published in Gig List
Tuesday, 23 July 2019 14:46

26.7.2019 - Tate Late, Tate Liverpool

Pride X Tate Liverpool

Royal Albert Dock Liverpool,
Liverpool L3 4BB

26 July 2019 at 18.30–22.30
FREE EVENT

Celebrate Pride in Liverpool with us at our special late night event
We’re kicking off our city’s Pride weekend with an exciting evening of free talks and workshops. Music will come from House of Suarez DJ Dave Brennan. Dave will pay tribute to Keith Haring and the 80s by playing all things vogue and house throughout the evening.
Entry into our ★★★★★ Keith Haring exhibition will be free for the evening.

Schedule for the evening
Includes:
19.00-21.00 Penguin Pride
Enjoy poetry performances and readings by Seán Hewitt, the winner of an Eric Gregory Award, a Northern Writers' Award, and the Resurgence Prize, Rosie Garland, Green Carnation and Polari Prize-shortlisted author, Keith Jarrett, a former UK Slam Poetry Champion and a PhD researcher at Birkbeck and Niven Govinden, a Green Carnation Prize-shortlisted author.

https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-liverpool/exhibition/keith-haring/pride-x-tate-liverpool

Published in Gig List
Desire, love, identity LGBT poetry evening

Bolton Central Library and Museum
Le Mans Crescent
Bolton
BL1 1SE
18:30 – 20:30
Thu, 11 April 2019

Free event

Bolton Museum is hosting a celebration of LGBT poetry to coincide with our exhibition Desire, Love Identity - In Bolton.

Special guests Rosie Garland & Dominic Berry will read their amazing poems!

Rosie is a novelist, poet and singer with a passion for language nurtured by libraries. She is currently the writer in residence at the John Rylands Library in Manchester. Dominic writes theatrical poetry for people of all ages and has toured his dynamic spoken word around the world. He is the current Glastonbury Festival Poet in Residence.

At the event we also welcome people to read poems during an Open Mic session and we would like the poems to reflect diversity, inclusion and aspects of LGBT life.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/poetry-evening-tickets-55578738503
http://www.boltonlams.co.uk/desire-love-identity-exploring-lgbtq-histories-in-bolton

Published in Gig List
Friday, 16 February 2018 10:13

11.3.2018 - Sugar & Spice 12, Manchester

Sugar and Spice 12: Standing Stronger Together

11th March 2018
LGBT Foundation,
5 Richmond Street
Manchester M1 3HF

I’m proud to be on a panel discussing “Overcoming Obstacles and Finding Resilience” – between 2-4pm on Sunday 11th March.
"To finish off our weekend of empowerment, confidence and community power, join our panel of inspirational, strong women as they discuss their own experiences of overcoming obstacles and finding resilience."

Sugar and Spice is Manchester’s annual festival for lesbian and bi women to celebrate International Women’s Day, and this year’s theme is ‘Standing Stronger Together’.
Sugar and Spice is for all women who identify as lesbian, bisexual or questioning, all or part of the time, including trans women, women of colour, older women, disabled/neurodivergent women, women of all faiths and backgrounds and non-binary/gender fluid people.

This FREE weekend event is back for the twelfth year with socialising, song-writing, discussions, dancing, crafts, photography, intersectional feminist histories, films and so much more! As always, there will be also be free food and holistic therapies for you to enjoy.
#sugarandspice12

http://lgbt.foundation/sugarandspice

Published in Gig List
The Time-Travelling Suffragettes, Louder than Words Festival, Manchester

The Principal Manchester
Oxford Street
Manchester
M60 7HA

Sat 11 November 2017
18:15 – 19:30 GMT

Armed with banners, a twinkle in their eye and a spanner or two for throwing into the works, Kitty and Lilibet have travelled to the present day to raise their voices in rousing song. Inspired by the enduring influence of Music Hall and its power to subvert whilst being thoroughly entertaining, they cast a queerly suffragette eye upon songs such as The Boy I Love Is Up In The Gallery, I’m Shy Mary Ellen and Hold Your Hand Out, Naughty Boy – and many more. The duo combines the musical talents of multi-instrumentalist Éilish McCracken (Rose McDowall, Sgt Buzfuz, Slate Islands, Ida Barr) and cabaret performer, novelist & lyricist Rosie Garland (The March Violets, Rosie Lugosi the Vampire Queen).

Tickets £8 – available here
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/time-travelling-suffragettes-tickets-36245562453

http://louderthanwordsfest.com/

Published in Gig List

Huge thanks to Kaite Welsh, Books Editor at Diva Magazine for this superb review of The Night Brother!
Here’s the full text of the review…

Diva review October 2017

"A must for anyone missing Sarah Waters’ foray into the Victorian era, siblings Edie and Gnome explore the delights of 19th century Manchester in Rosie Garland’s third novel - he during the night, her during the day. The prose is lush and vivid as gender fluidity mingles with magical realism. Edie grows increasingly jealous of her brother’s freedom and exhausted by her double life and the restrictions society places upon her. In The Night Brother, Garland crafts a study in dualism that would make Henry Jekyll jealous, and establishes herself as one of Britain’s best new historical novelists."

Kaite Welsh

http://www.divamag.co.uk/

Published in News
Rosie Garland: 'The Night Brother' - Reading and Book Signing

Location: John Rylands Library Historic Reading Room,
Deansgate,
Manchester M3 3EH
6-7pm
Free event

Introduced and chaired by Dr Xavier Aldana Reyes (Manchester Met).

Tagged ‘literary hero’ by The Skinny, Rosie Garland is an award-winning poet, novelist and singer with post-punk band The March Violets. With a passion for language nurtured by libraries, she started out in spoken word, garnering praise from Apples and Snakes as ‘one of the country’s finest performance poets’.
She is the author of Vixen, a Green Carnation Prize nominee. Debut novel, The Palace of Curiosities, won Book of the Year in the Co-op Respect Awards 2013 and was nominated for both The Desmond Elliott and the Polari First Book Prizes. Her latest novel The Night Brother (Borough Press) was reviewed in The Times as "A rich and ambitious tale set in late Victorian Manchester... Garland's prose is a delight: playful and exuberant. There are shades of Angela Carter in the mad world she creates... Full marks.'

Her most recent poetry collection, As In Judy, is out with Flapjack Press. She is half of The Time-Travelling Suffragettes. #gothfest17

https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/artshumanities/rah/gothic-manchester-festival/detail/index.php?id=6561

Published in Gig List
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News and Events

  • 10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today
    10.8.2019 - Val McDermid's 10 most compelling LGBTQI writers in the UK today

    I’m thrilled to announce that Val McDermid has selected me as one of the 10 most compelling LGBTQI+ writers working in the UK today!

    Val said: “These writers are writing for everyone. These are not words for a niche readership. These are not writings for a ghetto. These are the works of writers who have something to say that can be – and should be – heard by as many people as possible.”

    She continued: “Auden was wrong when he claimed “poetry makes nothing happen”. Words do change the world, reader by reader. They open our eyes, they provoke thought. The work of these 10 writers… will awaken in us fresh delight in the wonder of words.”

    The list was commissioned by the National Centre for Writing and British Council, supported by Arts Council England as part of a two-year programme to promote writing from the UK to an international audience. It also includes the amazing Colette Bryce, Juno Dawson, Juliet Jacques, Keith Jarrett, Kirsty Logan, Andrew McMillan, Fiona Mozley, Mary Paulson-Ellis & Luke Turner.

    The Guardian - The Word Is Out. Val McDermid selects Britain's 10 most outstanding lgbtq writers

    Written on Wednesday, 14 August 2019 08:44
  • 20.6.2019 - Peterloo: massacre or riot? The John Rylands Library
    20.6.2019 - Peterloo: massacre or riot? The John Rylands Library
    Peterloo – massacre or riot?

    On June 20th 2019, The John Rylands Library staged a live performance event to mark the bicentenary of the Peterloo Massacre. It was a first for the library and I was excited to take the part of Jemima Bamford – one of the thousands of men, women and children who gathered at St Peter’s Field in August 1819. I donned bonnet and shawl and created a speech, imagining how she might have spoken out against the actions of the militia, who charged into an unarmed crowd, and murdered up to 23 people.

    Then joined by 5 other actors, I took part in a public debate as we decide: was Peterloo a massacre or a riot? At the end of the debate, votes were cast, and Manchester decided overwhelmingly – massacre.

    Written on Sunday, 21 July 2019 10:32
  • 8.6.2019 - Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate, Wave-Gotik Treffen
    8.6.2019 - Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate, Wave-Gotik Treffen
    Guest vox with The Bellwether Syndicate at Wave-Gotik Treffen

    The high point of WGT 2019 was being invited to be guest vocalist with The Bellwether Syndicate from Chicago! Rocking out to a special rendition of The March Violets track ‘Snake Dance’…
    The gig on Saturday 8th June 2019 at Taubchenthal, Leipzig was packed out – and what a crowd…

    A great pleasure to work with William Faith, Sarah Rose (aka Scary Lady Sarah), keyboards Phil Destefano, bassist Paul Sin & drummer extraordinaire Stevyn Grey

    https://www.wave-gotik-treffen.de/ro/go4it.php?id=197&loc=en

    Written on Sunday, 21 July 2019 10:20
  • 'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    How to ask for a residency

    Since I wrote about the Power of Asking, I’ve been heartened by how many writers have told me they’re going to ask for Writers’ Residencies too. There are plenty of questions: What do you say? What do you ask for? This blog offers a few suggestions.

    Where do you want your residency to be?
    Chip shop, bus stop, lighthouse, theatre, cemetery. The choice is yours. Think of where you’d love to write. It may be a place you pass every day on the way to work, or somewhere you’ve stumbled on by chance. Perhaps you have a connection already. For example, when I was invited to read at The John Rylands Library, I fell in love with this Mancunian gem. It sparked a train of thought…

    What do you want to do?
    I’ve a pretty simple plan: my next novel is set in The John Rylands and I’m exploring what it’s like to write ‘on site’, drawing inspiration from the spirit of the place. You’ll have your own ideas. It’s a wonderful opportunity to try something new, with time to focus on your writing in an inspiring workspace. The clearer you are about what you’d like to create and how it’s connected to the venue you’ve chosen, the better. Do your research, and put together a proposal. I’ve broken this down below.

    How long is a residency?
    Weeks, months, or a year – it’s largely up to you and the organisation. My residency is running for a calendar year; time to produce a first draft of the novel. I’ve committed to being on site for one day a week, but can’t keep away from the place…

    What can you offer?
    As well as being clear about what you want to achieve, think about what you can offer your host organisation. Ideas can include giving talks, workshops, writing tutorials or readings, and writing blogs on the progress of the residency. You might produce a poem etched in the window, or devise a grand finale performance. There’s no limit.
    If you’re unsure, ask for advice from writer friends (or friends of friends) who’ve done residencies in the past. If you don’t know any – ask the internet. Social media can be a lot more supportive than you might imagine.

    How do you get an introduction?
    You’ll need to approach your chosen organisation to find out of they’re interested in your idea. I asked writer friends for signposting, and got an introduction. People were only too pleased to help, a warm reminder that we’re in this together. There’s a community of writers out there, and we are pretty groovy people.

    What about money?
    This blog is about building your own residency from scratch, not applying for a funded opportunity. So, when the question of money and payment arose (pretty much the first question), I said no. Nowhere has money for residencies, unless it’s a regular gig like The Forestry Commission
    And, unsurprisingly, these residencies are massively oversubscribed.
    A personal tip is to source funding elsewhere. I applied to The Arts Council - Successfully.

    Then again – aim for the stars! One writer told me she’s asking for a residency at a private members’ club with buckets of money. Needless to say, she IS asking them to fund it.

    What’s the worst that can happen?
    Fear of the word no can stop us asking in the first place. Your chosen venue may say no. But they’re not going to poke you with forks. Trust me on this one. And in the words of Steve Jobs: “Most people don't get experiences because they never ask. I've never found anybody who didn't want to help me when I've asked them for help.”

    Keep going. Keep asking.

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2019/02/26/how-to-ask-for-a-residency/

    Written on Sunday, 24 March 2019 10:08
  • 'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library
    'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library

    As part of my Writer’s Residency at The John Rylands Library, I’m writing a series of blogs… here’s the first – The Power of Asking.

    “I’ve just been appointed the first writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library. How did I manage this wonderful achievement? I asked.

    Sounds easy.

    It wasn’t. If you’re anything like me (and the longer I live, the more I realise I’m not alone), asking is far more difficult than it sounds.

    Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Unless you were born with a set of silver spoons in your mouth (which is everyone reading this, right?), then you’ve worked out that opportunities don’t fall magically into your lap. You’ve had to work hard to get where you are.

    I like what Julia Cameron (author of the inspirational ‘The Artists Way’) says: “Pray to catch the bus, then run as fast as you can.” It’s a reminder to put myself into the path of opportunities. The bus does not come to the front door. I have to leave the house, and darn well run for it.

    I have to take a deep breath, and ask. So, why is it so difficult?

    Here’s my take. I grew up with a spectacularly unhelpful dictum: Ask, don’t get. Don’t ask, don’t want. I shared this with friends recently, and was shocked to discover it’s very common. I end up stuck in a bizarre Catch 22 situation, thinking that if I have to ask for something, then I don’t deserve it. Or, that I must to wait for someone else to ask me. The most I’m allowed to do is stand around looking hopeful.
    This lose-lose mentality is combined with a vicious internal critic. I call her Mavis (I’ve blogged about her here and run Anti-Mavis workshops). She never, ever says anything nice. If someone says they like my writing, Mavis jumps in and whispers ‘they’re only being nice.’ In fact, she can be neatly summed up by this great Savage Chickens cartoon (Doug Savage):

    Naturally, my internal critic undermined any notion that somewhere as amazing as The John Rylands Library would want the likes of me.

    So – standing up and asking for what I want can be pretty damn hard. I’m swamped with fears of rejection, coming over as needy, an underachiever, someone who’s failed because they need to ask.

    Luckily, this isn’t a poor-me blog.

    Years ago I decided that I was not going to let fear of rejection stop me living a life that is too darn short as it is. I take inspiration from Jia Jiang, whose TED talk about dealing with rejection is well worth 15 minutes of anyone’s time.

    So, however hard it is to ask, to put myself forward, to send that manuscript to a competition or agent – I take several deep breaths and do it. In the words of Susan Jeffers: ‘feel the fear and do it anyway’.

    And here’s the good news. The John Rylands Library is delighted to have a writer-in-residence. Correction: The John Rylands Library is delighted to have me as a writer-in-residence.

    I have told Mavis to put that in her pipe and smoke it.

    Coming next – what I asked for, and how to ask for a residency.”

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2018/12/10/the-power-of-asking/

    Written on Saturday, 02 March 2019 15:36