Displaying items by tag: as in judy - Rosie Garland
Friday, 09 June 2017 11:48

28.6.2017 - Bad Language, Manchester

Bad Language - farewell to The Castle

The Castle pub,
Oldham Street,
Manchester.
Free admission.

Wednesday 28 June 2017, 7.30pm

On Wednesday 28 June, we hold our last regular event at The Castle. Come and celebrate literature, laughter and lashings of booze with a special Bad Language featuring guest readers that have helped make The Castle our home over the past six and a half years.
Bad Language began in November 2010 with a couple of tentative discussion events followed by an anthology launch and a literary pub quiz. The first monthly Bad Language event at The Castle was on 26 January 2011.
This month, we put our open mic on hold as we invite some of our favourite readers – incl Rosie Garland - to see off The Castle in style. Bring balloons, bring cake, bring a little pedalo for Joe. Then on 26 July 2017, we relaunch Bad Language at Gullivers, with the next open mic spots available from 10 July.
Come and say goodbye to an amazing venue space – and thanks to The Castle staff for oiling the wheels of live literature for so many years.

Published in Gig List
Rebel Dykes & For Books’ Sake at Wonder Women Festival

HOME
2 Tony Wilson Place,
Manchester, M15 4FN
12th March 2017

4:00-6.00pm
From £4

Created by a Manchester-based queer film crew, Rebel Dykes tells the story of a bunch of kick-ass women from London in the post-punk 1980s. The Rebel Dykes challenged norms ahead of the international riot grrrl movement, and the film features women’s punk music, animation, archive material and recreated footage. This queer-punk documentary is in post-production, and HOME will screen the work-in-progress cut which sold-out at BFI Flare in March 2016.
This will be followed by a showcase of incendiary poetry and performance put together by For Books’ Sake, featuring blisteringly bold and brilliant queer women writers from across the UK. Expect exciting, powerful spoken word that celebrates sexuality, rebellion and revolution, featuring Majikle, author of Margaret Thatcher Made Me an SM Dyke; internationally renowned poet, playwright and educator Sophia Walker, author of Opposite the Tourbus (Burning Eye Books); and Manchester literary luminary and dark fiction darling Rosie Garland, author of numerous poetry collections and novels The Palace of Curiosities, Vixen and The Night Brother (forthcoming from Borough Press), compered by For Books’ Sake founder Jane Bradley.

Curated by Instigate Arts
Collection in aid of MASH, Manchester Action on Street Health

http://forbookssake.net/events/event/rebel-dykes-wonder-women-manchester/

https://www.creativetourist.com/event/rebel-dykes/

Published in Gig List
Women of the World Festival Cabaret

Clore Ballroom,
Level 2
Southbank Centre
Belvedere Road
London SE1 8XX

9-11pm

Diva Hollywood is producing and hosting the Friday night Cabaret event for the Wow Festival in March at The South Bank. A diverse and delicious cabaret, which is not for the faint hearted. Celebrating topics of gender, disability, body image and much more.
She has hunted far and wide and brought together the finest and most challenging female performers from around the globe for Divalicious Cabaret. They will shock you, break your heart, make you laugh, entice and tease you but most of all make you remember that the 21st century Woman is Diverse and Delicious.

https://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whats-on/festivals-series/women-of-the-world

Published in Gig List
Friday, 03 February 2017 12:53

7.3.2017 - WORD! Leicester

WORD!

is the longest running poetry and spoken
word night in the Midlands.

Y Theatre
7 East Street,
Leicester, LE1 6EY

£4 / £7

8pm (performers 7pm)

Based at the Y Theatre, Leicester, it takes place on the first Tuesday of every month, between 8.00 and 10.30pm. The evening is composed of an open mic, followed by special guest Rosie Garland.
PLUS
Creative writing workshop with Rosie Garland 4-6pm

http://wordpoetryleic.blogspot.co.uk/

Published in Gig List
Friday, 03 February 2017 11:52

2.3.2017 - UTTER! Luton

UTTER! Lutonia
The Hat Factory
65 - 67 Bute Street,
Luton LU1 2EY

Thursday 2nd March, 2017
19:30 - 22:30
£5 / £3 concessions
To book tickets please call 01582 878100
UTTER! Spoken Word brings a Panoply of spoken word and literary talent from the locality and beyond.
The bill features: Rosie Garland
The night will be powerful and enlivening, full of bubbling words and running rhythms, voice and mind connecting directly in a room alive with ideas. Compered by Lee Nelson “Our very own peoples’ poet” – Luton News, the keeper of Luton’s live-poetry flame, veteran of the Glastonbury and Edinburgh Fringe Festivals.
http://www.lutonculture.com/hat-factory/whats-on/2017/03/02/utter-lutonia-14/2170/

Published in Gig List
Campus Pride

Campus Pride rolls out across campus in February, with a special live literature event on Wednesday 22nd, featuring Rosie Garland!
Plus OPEN MIC.
Free event

Venue:
Stage 2
Leeds Beckett University Student Union
City Campus,
Portland Building,
Portland Way,
Leeds LS1 3HE

Time: 6.30pm for a 7pm start
Contact Details
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Published in Gig List
Sunday, 04 December 2016 10:41

27.1.2017 - Polari, Southbank Centre, London

The first Polari of 2017, now in its tenth year!

Curated and hosted by author Paul Burston with Stella Duffy, Rosie Garland, Nathan Evans, Chris Chalmers and Ann Mann

Level 5 Function Room at Royal Festival Hall
The Southbank Centre
Belvedere Road,
SE1 8XX London

£5

You’re guaranteed mischief and sparkle as this beloved LGBT literary salon returns for its 10th year.

Stella Duffy reads from her new book, London Lies Beneath, as the first headliner appearance for Polari at Southbank Centre in 2017. Inspired by real events, this is the story of three friends, and a tragedy that will change them forever. It is also a song of south London, of working class families with hidden histories, of a bright and complex world long neglected. London Lies Beneath is a powerful and compelling novel, rich with life and full of wisdom.

Joining Stella with readings from their latest works are Rosie Garland, Nathan Evans, Chris Chalmers and Ann Mann.

London’s award-winning LGBT literary salon continues to showcase the best in emerging and established testimony to queer hearts and lives. Polari is curated and hosted by author and journalist Paul Burston.

Recommended for ages 18+

http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whatson/polari-100002

Published in Gig List
Sunday, 04 December 2016 10:32

25.1.2017 - Bad Language, Manchester

Bad Language

Wednesday 25th January 2017
7.30pm
The Castle pub,
Oldham Street,
Manchester

Free admission.

Saboteur Award-winning Bad Language is a live literature promotion team based in Manchester.
Our special guest in January 2017 is Rosie Garland!

As always, our open mic is ready and waiting – email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and grab a slot. Remember, if you’re new, we hold half our slots for people who have never performed for us before.

https://badlanguagemcr.com/

Published in Gig List
Sunday, 04 December 2016 10:26

18.1.2017 - Poems, Prose & Pints, Harrogate

Poems Prose and Pints

The Tap and Spile

42 Tower Street,
Harrogate, HG1 1HS

Entry: £1
Time: 7.30pm

Open Mic Event
With special guest – Rosie Garland

Every 3rd Wednesday of the month 7.30pm for 8pm, intimate space for spoken word with supportive audience, which welcomes performers, readers and listeners. Lively and innovative open mic sessions with frequent guest poets and hosts.

click here for Facebook Group -

https://www.facebook.com/groups/137267822541/?fref=ts

Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Published in Gig List

I am delighted to announce the launch of ‘As In Judy’ – my new poetry collection with Flapjack Press. It’s my first solo poetry publication since ‘Everything Must Go’ (Holland Park Press 2012). I’m really excited.

I wish to express heartfelt gratitude to Char March for her generous editorial input, without which this collection would be far weaker.

And to Ruth Fainlight, for her inspiring suggestion that ‘As In Judy’ would make a great title.

Both John Hyatt and David Hoyle have made blushingly complimentary comments about the poems.

“The reason I love Rosie’s work so much is that she provides food for thought. She addresses issues that need addressing, and imagines the inner and outer landscapes we all inhabit with eloquence and grace. Shed your light, Rosie.” David Hoyle 2016

“You spend all that time trying to understand the world, its family relationships,
friendships, social systems through a serial adventure of episodes mundane and
or memorable. You spend all that time trying to fit into the human. Then, you are
propelled into realisation through a life-threatening disease. Travelling not
outward into the world but inward to the beating heart of the matter, you dive
deep into the DNA. You are the resplendent there. You are the clicking queen of
the insects. When you dress again in flesh and skin, you go amongst the sleeping
humans and new and glittering worlds are left in your wake. Welcome to Rosie!”

John Hyatt 2016

Published in News
Page 2 of 3

News and Events

  • 'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    'How to ask for a residency' - The John Rylands blog
    How to ask for a residency

    Since I wrote about the Power of Asking, I’ve been heartened by how many writers have told me they’re going to ask for Writers’ Residencies too. There are plenty of questions: What do you say? What do you ask for? This blog offers a few suggestions.

    Where do you want your residency to be?
    Chip shop, bus stop, lighthouse, theatre, cemetery. The choice is yours. Think of where you’d love to write. It may be a place you pass every day on the way to work, or somewhere you’ve stumbled on by chance. Perhaps you have a connection already. For example, when I was invited to read at The John Rylands Library, I fell in love with this Mancunian gem. It sparked a train of thought…

    What do you want to do?
    I’ve a pretty simple plan: my next novel is set in The John Rylands and I’m exploring what it’s like to write ‘on site’, drawing inspiration from the spirit of the place. You’ll have your own ideas. It’s a wonderful opportunity to try something new, with time to focus on your writing in an inspiring workspace. The clearer you are about what you’d like to create and how it’s connected to the venue you’ve chosen, the better. Do your research, and put together a proposal. I’ve broken this down below.

    How long is a residency?
    Weeks, months, or a year – it’s largely up to you and the organisation. My residency is running for a calendar year; time to produce a first draft of the novel. I’ve committed to being on site for one day a week, but can’t keep away from the place…

    What can you offer?
    As well as being clear about what you want to achieve, think about what you can offer your host organisation. Ideas can include giving talks, workshops, writing tutorials or readings, and writing blogs on the progress of the residency. You might produce a poem etched in the window, or devise a grand finale performance. There’s no limit.
    If you’re unsure, ask for advice from writer friends (or friends of friends) who’ve done residencies in the past. If you don’t know any – ask the internet. Social media can be a lot more supportive than you might imagine.

    How do you get an introduction?
    You’ll need to approach your chosen organisation to find out of they’re interested in your idea. I asked writer friends for signposting, and got an introduction. People were only too pleased to help, a warm reminder that we’re in this together. There’s a community of writers out there, and we are pretty groovy people.

    What about money?
    This blog is about building your own residency from scratch, not applying for a funded opportunity. So, when the question of money and payment arose (pretty much the first question), I said no. Nowhere has money for residencies, unless it’s a regular gig like The Forestry Commission
    And, unsurprisingly, these residencies are massively oversubscribed.
    A personal tip is to source funding elsewhere. I applied to The Arts Council - Successfully.

    Then again – aim for the stars! One writer told me she’s asking for a residency at a private members’ club with buckets of money. Needless to say, she IS asking them to fund it.

    What’s the worst that can happen?
    Fear of the word no can stop us asking in the first place. Your chosen venue may say no. But they’re not going to poke you with forks. Trust me on this one. And in the words of Steve Jobs: “Most people don't get experiences because they never ask. I've never found anybody who didn't want to help me when I've asked them for help.”

    Keep going. Keep asking.

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2019/02/26/how-to-ask-for-a-residency/

    Written on Sunday, 24 March 2019 10:08
  • 'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library
    'The Power of Asking' blog - The John Rylands Library

    As part of my Writer’s Residency at The John Rylands Library, I’m writing a series of blogs… here’s the first – The Power of Asking.

    “I’ve just been appointed the first writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library. How did I manage this wonderful achievement? I asked.

    Sounds easy.

    It wasn’t. If you’re anything like me (and the longer I live, the more I realise I’m not alone), asking is far more difficult than it sounds.

    Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. Unless you were born with a set of silver spoons in your mouth (which is everyone reading this, right?), then you’ve worked out that opportunities don’t fall magically into your lap. You’ve had to work hard to get where you are.

    I like what Julia Cameron (author of the inspirational ‘The Artists Way’) says: “Pray to catch the bus, then run as fast as you can.” It’s a reminder to put myself into the path of opportunities. The bus does not come to the front door. I have to leave the house, and darn well run for it.

    I have to take a deep breath, and ask. So, why is it so difficult?

    Here’s my take. I grew up with a spectacularly unhelpful dictum: Ask, don’t get. Don’t ask, don’t want. I shared this with friends recently, and was shocked to discover it’s very common. I end up stuck in a bizarre Catch 22 situation, thinking that if I have to ask for something, then I don’t deserve it. Or, that I must to wait for someone else to ask me. The most I’m allowed to do is stand around looking hopeful.
    This lose-lose mentality is combined with a vicious internal critic. I call her Mavis (I’ve blogged about her here and run Anti-Mavis workshops). She never, ever says anything nice. If someone says they like my writing, Mavis jumps in and whispers ‘they’re only being nice.’ In fact, she can be neatly summed up by this great Savage Chickens cartoon (Doug Savage):

    Naturally, my internal critic undermined any notion that somewhere as amazing as The John Rylands Library would want the likes of me.

    So – standing up and asking for what I want can be pretty damn hard. I’m swamped with fears of rejection, coming over as needy, an underachiever, someone who’s failed because they need to ask.

    Luckily, this isn’t a poor-me blog.

    Years ago I decided that I was not going to let fear of rejection stop me living a life that is too darn short as it is. I take inspiration from Jia Jiang, whose TED talk about dealing with rejection is well worth 15 minutes of anyone’s time.

    So, however hard it is to ask, to put myself forward, to send that manuscript to a competition or agent – I take several deep breaths and do it. In the words of Susan Jeffers: ‘feel the fear and do it anyway’.

    And here’s the good news. The John Rylands Library is delighted to have a writer-in-residence. Correction: The John Rylands Library is delighted to have me as a writer-in-residence.

    I have told Mavis to put that in her pipe and smoke it.

    Coming next – what I asked for, and how to ask for a residency.”

    https://rylandscollections.wordpress.com/2018/12/10/the-power-of-asking/

    Written on Saturday, 02 March 2019 15:36
  • January 2019 - short fiction highlights
    January 2019 - short fiction highlights
    Great to start the new year with a slew of short fiction highlights!

    My story ‘Burning Girl’ is in the ‘Disturbing the Beast’ anthology from Boudicca Press, out February 2019.

    My flash fic, ‘Your sons & your daughters are beyond’ is being published in Longleaf Review on Feb 10th 2019 http://longleafreview.com/

    … flash fic ‘What goes on in the bushes’ is featured in issue 16 of The Cabinet of Heed, mid-January 2019
    https://cabinetofheed.com/

    I’ve been
    Longlisted in TSS flash fiction competition, winter 2018
    https://www.theshortstory.co.uk/flash-fiction-400/flash-fiction-results/
    &
    Longlisted in Reflex flash fiction competition, winter 2018
    https://www.reflexfiction.com/flash-fiction-contest-schedule/

    Written on Wednesday, 16 January 2019 14:20
  • 1.12.2018 - Man City match - singing The Pankhurst Anthem
    1.12.2018 - Man City match - singing The Pankhurst Anthem

    What an adventure!
    On Saturday December 1st, I sang the Pankhurst Anthem – specially written by Helen Pankhurst & Lucy Pankhurst - in Etihad Stadium in front of the Manchester City crowd at half time!

    I can honestly say I've never sung in front of a crown of 50,000 people. What an experience.

    All part of the run-up to the unveiling of Hazel Reeves wonderful statue of Emmeline Pankhurst in St Peter’s Square, Manchester on December 14th 2018.

    Written on Friday, 07 December 2018 11:01
  • November 2018 - The John Rylands Library writer-in-residence
    November 2018 - The John Rylands Library writer-in-residence

    Finally, I can announce that I am inaugural Writer-in-Residence at The John Rylands Library in Manchester. It’s fantastic news.
    How? I put together a proposal, & asked. The power of asking, indeed.

    Read the article in the University of Manchester magazine, here:

    “When I first moved to Manchester I was stunned to discover this incredible library with such a surprising history,” remembers Rosie Garland, singer with Leeds post-punk band The March Violets and writer-in-residence at The John Rylands Library.
    “It’s always been one of my favourite places in Manchester and the idea that I’m now working in it and writing about it as the Library’s first writer-in- residence is a dream come true.”

    Read full article here
    https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/magazine/features/novel-library-research/

    Written on Monday, 12 November 2018 10:43